Welfare Criterion

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Welfare Criterion

The basis by which one measures the benefits of a change against its drawbacks. For example, one may elect to make a change if everyone gains and no one loses, or if the number or the quality of the gains outpaces the number or quality of the losses. There is no single welfare criterion; the criterion used varies according to the ethics or preferences of the one(s) considering the change.
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No fixtures can take place unless the BHA's equine welfare criteria have been satisfied.
We have not reached a consensus yet on four fields that deal with the minimum and maximum payments, eligible beneficiaries, flaws in the current subsidies and social welfare criteria and merging allowances.
Bergstrom and Randall present a comprehensive examination of resource scarcity, basic ecology, welfare criteria, property rights, environmental ethics, and the various economic, policy, and management concepts that inform them.
This flexibility enables us to use a wide variety of welfare criteria, including those inferred from public opinion, to evaluate policy reforms.
MCDONALD'S is to source all the pork for its UK menu from British farms that meet strict animal welfare criteria, it has announced.
One chapter is devoted to introducing the problem, mainly to remind readers of the interdependence between the welfare criteria of wealth-efficiency and distributive fairness.
Despite the difficulty of analyzing the overall effect of a merger on both consumer and total welfare in the long run, there has been extensive debate about which of the two welfare criteria to use.
Rapporteur Carlos Trias Pinto (Group III, Spain) stressed that this could steer consumers towards goods produced in line with social, environmental, health, safety and animal welfare criteria.
Attempts by Kaldor, Hicks, and Scitovsky to formulate more flexible welfare criteria were doomed from the outset.
At the core of the latter are the neoclassical economic welfare criteria encapsulated in what he calls the Pareto-Arrow-Bergson Standard of economic efficiency, consumer sovereignty, and redistributive social optimality.
It is those low-income families who fall just outside the social welfare criteria who will be hit the most.
Linden operates a direct farmer supply scheme, allowing the company to source cattle and sheep from farms that fulfill specific farming and animal welfare criteria.