Weight

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Weight

Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Weighted

Describing an average in which some values count for more than others. For example, if an index consisting of 10 stocks is weighted for price, this means that the average price of the stocks will move more when the stocks with higher price move. Most indices use weighted averages so "smaller" values do not affect the index inordinately. This helps correct for the fact that averages tend to be affected by extreme values. One of the most common ways of weighting an average is to weight for market capitalization.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
This study also shows that ages, when the brain's energy needs increase during early childhood, are also ages of declining weight gain. As the energy needed for brain development declines in older children and adolescents, the rate of weight gain increases in parallel.
"We all know that how much energy our bodies burn is an important influence on weight gain," said Kuzawa, professor of anthropology in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and a faculty fellow with the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern.
Dr Ellie Milby is a counselling psychologist Tiredness can lead to weight gain
"We discovered that when we switched off the production of NPY in the amygdala, weight gain was reduced.
Specifically, they wanted to understand whether a relatively brief and straightforward intervention could reduce weight gain over Christmas.
The researchers noted that although the difference in weight was marginally smaller than expected, simple methods such as curbing excess eating and drinking, physical exercise and regular weighing at home are still important, as preventing any amount of weight gain will have a positive impact on health outcomes.
In further multivariate analysis, adverse maternal outcomes associated with gestational weight gain above that recommended by the guidelines included hypertensive diseases of pregnancy for any parity (aOR, 1.84) and increased risk of cesarean delivery in nulliparous and multiparous women (aORs, 1.44 and 1.26, respectively).
The corresponding hazard ratios for all-cause deaths in the same weight gain groups were 0.81 (95% CI, 0.73-0.90); 0.52 (95% CI, 0.46-0.59); 0.46 (95% CI, 0.38-0.55); 0.50 (95% CI, 0.40-0.63); and 0.57 (95% CI, 0.54-0.59).
"A temporary increase in the risk of type 2 diabetes due to weight gain after smoking cessation did not attenuate the benefits of smoking cessation on reducing total and cardiovascular mortality," the authors write.
We do know that taking antipsychotic drugs can result in putting on weight, but the association between antidepressants and weight gain is not cut and dried.
I eat a lot and I eat almost everything, why am I unable to gain weight?Eating a lot does not necessary equate to weight gain. There are several factors that could be genetic, biological, metabolic rate, exercise rate and the quality of food you eat.
Results found weight gain before 24 weeks--regardless of the weight gain later--had the greatest impact on infant size.