PORTAL

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PORTAL

A trading platform operated by NASDAQ of closely-held companies and other companies for investment by extremely high net-worth individuals. This market is largely exempt from the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. In 2007, the Portal Market required an individual to have a minimum net worth of $100 million to qualify to trade on it.

PORTAL

A NASD trading system for unregistered foreign and domestic securities.
References in periodicals archive ?
What are the constraints to the use of web search engines and reference sources for research activities by undergraduates?
"Concept of Search Engine Optimization in Web Search Engine" International Journal of Advanced Engineering Research and Studies E-ISSN2249-8974.
launched its own search engine based on the combined technologies of its acquisitions and providing a service that gave pre- eminence to the Web search engine over the directory.
Browser environments and Web search engines must be studied as an ILE in universities.
See Danny Sullivan's Web site http://searchenginewatch.com for in-depth, up-to-date information on Web search engines.
Lynch thinks that eventually web search engines could all run using similar technology.
[3.] Advanced Internet and Web Search Engines: How Search Engines Work.
Not a metasearch site per se, but a window to a fairly comprehensive listing of Web search engines and metasearch sites.
Gateways and Web Search Engines. We have listed in Tables 1-6 the best Web sites in each of the categories in this article.
Now that web search engines can give different results depending upon the device where the search originated-with the preference being mobile-you need to check results from a desktop versus mobile search.
From time to time, heroic and resourceful deep web search engines appear.
Researchers and practitioners have developed a wide range of innovative interface ideas, but only the most broadly acceptable make their way into major web search engines. This book summarizes these developments, presenting the state of the art of search interface design, both in academic research and in deployment in commercial systems.