deficit

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Deficit

An excess of liabilities over assets, of losses over profits, or of expenditure over income.

Deficit

A situation in which outflow of money exceeds inflow. That is, a deficit occurs when a government, company, or individual spends more than he/she/it receives in a given period of time, usually a year. One's deficit adds to one's debt, and, therefore, many analysts believe that deficits are unsustainable over the long-term. See also: Surplus.

deficit

1. A negative retained earnings balance. A deficit results when the accumulated losses and dividend payments of a business exceed its earnings.

deficit

see BUDGET DEFICIT, BALANCE OF PAYMENTS.
References in periodicals archive ?
The same was observed in other water deficit systems (LEWIS JUNIOR; VAN ARSDEL, 1978; ANSELMI; PUCCINELLI, 1992; BLODGETT et al.
s] in strategies with water deficit, due to the less frequent irrigation application, The values of E/T are lower than those reported in the literature (PAREDES et al,, 2014; GRASSINI et al,, 2009), This can be attributed to the presence of crop residues on the soil surface and to drip irrigation, which provides the partial moistening of the soil,
The highest SD rates (Figure 2) were observed at 300 DAP (January / 2013), beginning of the rainy season in the region (Figure 3), showing no significant differences between the water regime treatments, (Figure 2), at 480 DAP (July / 2013), period of water deficit (Figure 3).
Changes of some anti-oxidative physiological indices under soil water deficits among 10 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.
Effect of water deficit and application of nutrient elements on yield, yield components and water use efficiency of corn.
1986) state that the maximum soil water deficit was ~50 mm with this treatment, that the average period between irrigations was 22 days, and that 'evidence from this trial, and .
Summary: Findings of scientific studies presented, on Tuesday, at a seminar on "Water and Climate Changes," showed that ecosystems in Tunisia are "fragile" and "unable" to cope with such natural risks like forest fires, water deficit and drought, which are expected as a result of global temperature rise by 2020.
ISLAMABAD, March 10, 2011 (Balochistan Times): Pakistan will face water deficit of millions of acre feet if more dams were not constructed and water storage capacity was not enhanced in next few years.
India would face a water deficit of 50 percent by 2030 while China would have a shortage of 25 percent.
As for wastewater, it can contribute to reduce the water deficit if utilised properly.
However, due to the global expansion of irrigated areas and the limited availability of irrigation water, there is need to optimize water use in order to maximize crop yields under water deficit conditions [4].