Watchdog Group

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Watchdog Group

An organization, often nonprofit, that researches and publishes information on alleged abuses in a certain area or sector. For example, a watchdog group may investigate the truth of stories reported in the media or poor environmental practices in private companies. At their best, watchdog groups may expose real corruption, but they may be susceptible to bias themselves.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This compared to 194 homes in the first quarter of 2015, the watchdog said, noting that in total 1,665 settler units were advanced last year, 1,044 of which were retroactively legalized.
Luke Henderson, 11, from Cramlington said: "Watchdogs. It's so real and you can just roam about the city when you don't have missions to do."
Global Banking News-January 11, 2013--Market watchdog calls for changes to Euribor(C)2013 ENPublishing - http://www.enpublishing.co.uk
"Bahrain's doors are open for all UN agencies and watchdogs to pay visits," he said, describing the stance as reflecting commitment to transparency in dealing with human rights issues.
Putting out a daily newspaper, meeting the increasing demands of the Web, and plugging the holes left by departing staffers pushed much of our watchdog work to the sidelines.
The current rail watchdog is a second resort for people dissatisfied with the response of train companies to their complaints.
The regional NHS Executive said in its annual review of Coventry Community Health Council that the watchdog was continuing to provide a "proven quality service" to the public.
Jobs are under threat after Britain's new energy watchdog snubbed Birmingham in favour of London.
The future Speaker of the House isn't interested in helping congressional watchdogs do their work.
Watchdogs received 176 complaints where the society had simply refused to investigate alleged failings by a solicitor.
One critic is the GAO, which in May issued a report politely titled, "Revised Approach Could Improve OMB's Effectiveness." Another critic is Senator John Glenn, whose committee has been holding hearings on the poor performance of government watchdogs. Showing a talent for saying the right things at the right times, Darman recently told Glenn that OMB needs to "help reduce the problems that failures of collective oversight, including its own, may have produced." He added that he agreed with the call for "better integration of management and budget functions."