Watchdog Group

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Watchdog Group

An organization, often nonprofit, that researches and publishes information on alleged abuses in a certain area or sector. For example, a watchdog group may investigate the truth of stories reported in the media or poor environmental practices in private companies. At their best, watchdog groups may expose real corruption, but they may be susceptible to bias themselves.
References in periodicals archive ?
Watchdog journalism: India's three largest English-language newspapers and the Right to Information Act.
While the mission of watchdog journalism has been renewed by the Trump administration's war with the press, there has been a notable absence of an important form of political satire long associated with newspapers that doesn't appear to have benefited from a Trump bump.
They have the user base " billions " and engineering prowess that no media company can match, which Stan Wischnowski, the Philadelphia Media Network executive editor, told me, is"putting democracy as a whole at risk because it has put at risk the kind of watchdog journalism we've been doing for 187 years."
'One of the defining features of authoritarian tendencies is the suppression of investigative journalism or watchdog journalism ...
And finally, it was in newspapers that media watchdog journalism in Ghana first emerged.
One thing that hasn't changed is the speech top editors everywhere give reporters when they're hired: They are going to be committed to watchdog journalism; they are going to ask tough questions and do big stories.
Keywords: journalistic role performance, media systems, comparative research, watchdog journalism
"We are redistributing resources into newly defined areas, while continuing to keep investigative and watchdog journalism a top priority," Journal News Publisher Janet Hasson told Capital.
They gasp when we tell them that you, dear readers, show your love for MoJo not just via your subscriptions, but by giving what you can beyond that; that your participation on this front beats that of public radio listeners, by far; and that this foundation of unflinching support is what has given us the seed capital to survive, thrive, and expand at a time when watchdog journalism is more necessary than ever.
While he does evaluate the traditional functions of watchdog journalism, Stanton also allows room to explore the significance of more idiosyncratic reporting--for example, The Age's story on Julia Gillard's polkadot dress (p.
More important, it symbolizes the rise of watchdog journalism for the first time in dozens of authoritarian nations around the world.
Pinto writes that watchdog journalism is disappearing from mainstream news.