Wash

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Wash

Gains equal losses.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Wash

A situation in which the profit on one activity or investment equals the loss on another. When an investment is a wash, it is said to break even.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved
References in classic literature ?
He answered that in Washington people were always meeting again and that at any rate he shouldn't fail to wait upon her.
He sat there half an hour, and the warm dead stillness of the Washington night--nowhere are the nights so silent--came in at the open window, mingled with a soft sweet earthy smell, the smell of growing things and in particular, as he thought, of Mrs.
It was a 'Sonnet to the Snow on Mount Washington,' and had been contributed that very afternoon, bearing a signature of great distinction in magazines and annals.
The conversation of our party soon became more animated and sincere, and we recounted some traditions of the Indians, who believed that the father and mother of their race were saved from a deluge by ascending the peak of Mount Washington. The children of that pair have been overwhelmed, and found no such refuge.
From that day forward Impey Barbicane became one of the greatest citizens of the United States, a kind of Washington of science.
From this station, as I pleased myself with imagining, Gage may have beheld his disastrous victory on Bunker Hill (unless one of the tri-mountains intervened), and Howe have marked the approaches of Washington's besieging army; although the buildings since erected in the vicinity have shut out almost every object, save the steeple of the Old South, which seems almost within arm's length.
"I have a good many friends round about Washington," Mr.
Sabin, the government at Washington, and something under his breath which he did not dare to name openly.
He began to tell little lies about business engagements that would give him freedom to walk alone in the street at night and, the chance offering, he secretly re-rented the room fac- ing Washington Square.
So Grandfather told his auditors, that, on General Washington's arrival at Cambridge, his first care was to reconnoitre the British troops with his spy-glass, and to examine the condition of his own army.
Washington's early life, as frankly set down in "Up from Slavery," do not give quite a whole view of his education.
As Washington may be called the head-quarters of tobacco-tinctured saliva, the time is come when I must confess, without any disguise, that the prevalence of those two odious practices of chewing and expectorating began about this time to be anything but agreeable, and soon became most offensive and sickening.