War Exclusion Clause

(redirected from War Clauses)

War Exclusion Clause

1. A clause in some life insurance policies stating that the insurer does not have to pay the death benefit if the insured dies from a war-related injury. War exclusion clauses are most common in wartime; they generally cannot be added if a war starts after a policy is issued.

2. A clause in some bills of lading and other transport documents exempting the insurer from paying losses if a ship is damaged or destroyed as the result of an act of war. For example, if a torpedo fires on a ship as part of a declaration of war or other hostile act, the war exclusion clause protects the insurer from covering the value.
References in periodicals archive ?
Policies for military members have no military restrictions or war clauses.
Insurance coverage must provide for the following conditions: - Valuation: 110% CIF, - Coverage: All risks including Fire, Theft, Dishonest Acts, Quake, Flood, and Wind as well as War Clauses and Strikes clauses as applicable, - Deductibles and exclusions: Please provide details of any deductibles or exclusions applicable and who would pay those.
This is best achieved by insuring the shipment under the Institute Commodity Trades Clauses (A), Institute Strikes Clauses (Commodity Trades) and the Institute War Clauses (Commodity Trades).
Institute Cargo Clauses, also referred to as All Risks , Institute War Clauses and Institute Strikes Clauses as applicable
Many insurance policies have a war clause, under which losses caused as a result of acts of war are excluded from cover.