Wall Street Week


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Wall Street Week

A television show that aired on PBS between 1970 and 2005. The show summarized stock market performance for the week and featured a panel that made recommendations for the coming week. Panelists routinely made predictions for future market movements. It was the first major show of its type and, at its peak, was one of the most followed programs for investment advice. See also: Elves, Wall Street Week Index, Elves Index.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, Larry Moscow, a former CNBC producer who helped create "Squawk Box" and "Power Lunch," produces PBS'S new "Wall Street Week With Fortune." The program is co-hosted by Fortune's editorial director, Geoff Colvin, 49, and Karen Gibbs, also 49, a journalist who worked at CNBC as well as Fox News.
"Wall Street Week" invented the financial news broadcast, long before the cable channels intruded with their 24-hour touts and never-say-sell analysts.
But Wall Street Week is hardly the only media outfit that mystifies the market.
Thus, we perform a more complete analysis of the stock recommendation on the television show Wall Street Week. We determine (1) if there is useful information released to the public by examining the short-term and long-term price performance of both buy and sell recommendations in aggregate and on an individual recommender basis, and (2) whether the short-term volume activity is correlated with the performance of the recommendations.
All panting programs This Old House; Hometime Nightly Business Report Adam Smith All quilting programs A Woman's Health MotorWeek Stained Glass with Vicki Payne Stained Glass with Vicki Payne Travels in Europe Sewing with Nancy Cooking programs LionHearty safety messages Bloomberg Business News Nightly Business Report Adam Smith Business News Briefs Wall Street Week
Tastefully appointed, with book-filled shelves, warmly colored wall hangings and comfortable chairs, it serves as a meeting place for economic experts, millions of Americans, a few wacky elves and a witty and charming man some call the "sex symbol of the dismal science." Of course, the room is actually a set in the studios of Maryland Public Television and the gathering is a television show, "Wall Street Week With Louis Rukeyser." Rukeyser is the man who hosts the party - America's main source of economic news for the last quarter-century.
Punsters, such as Lou Rukeyser of "Wall Street Week," would appreciate the following: A contest between two southern debaters ended in a drawl.
Nor must I forget the sage advice of the "stock analyst," an animal to be found in publications such as The Wall Street Journal, Barron's, and Forbes, as well as "Wall Street Week" and "The Nightly Business Report" on the tube: The more laudatory the praise, the more assurance I have that the analyst has been caught with the stock and is trying to unload it on the "bigger fool." Had I not adopted this bigger fool role in several instances, I'm sure I wouldn't be enjoying the tax status I hold today.
and Voice of America; and, second, from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (C.P.B.), the folks who bring you, with co-payment by corporations and the browbeaten public, MacNeil-Lehrer, Wall Street Week and Morning Edition.
The day the earthquake rocked California, Louis Rukeyser, host of public TV's "Wall Street Week," shook up his audience at Scan-Tech 89, challenging some views on the economy and the stock market.
"Mad Money" is more akin to a freewheeling sports call-in program than the staid "Wall Street Week" and probably couldn't have been carried off before reality TV started breaking taboos or before the scandals of Enron and its ilk.
Bond made his name managing more than $600 million in public and private pension funds and by appearing regularly on PBS' Wall Street Week with Louis Rukeyser.