Walkout

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Walkout

The act in which all the employees of a company leave the workplace and refuse to work any longer that day. A walkout is a type of protest for better wages, benefits or other demands. It may be sustained (and therefore part of a strike) or it may be a one-off event.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Communication Workers Union will announce the result of a ballot of 120,000 of its members at the Royal Mail, with officials confident of achieving backing for nationwide walk-outs.
The walk-outs, the first in Ryanair's 32-year history, are being held by staff demanding an overhaul of the system of contracts and collective bargaining, which they say gives management too much power.
With our guarantees that there will be no compulsory redundancies, no impact on safety and a full timetable in place during the walk-outs, these strikes will cost RMT members pay for no reason, and we urge the union to rejoin us around the negotiating table.
And workers have threatened further walk-outs during December and January.
But the largest union insisted Coun Rudge was mistaken in his interpretation of the law and threatened further walk-outs in the run-up to the May local government elections.
5 per cent pay offer which was heavily rejected by postal workers and led to a series of national walk-outs over the summer which crippled postal services.
But the recent walk-outs have led to calls by local campaigners for what they call 'dangerous' prisoners to be placed elsewhere.
Speaking ahead of this week's review of the Good Friday Agreement, he said the walk-outs would allow him to carry out internal reforms.
It shows the lack of trust and dignity that has led to these unofficial walk-outs.
The 48-hour strike, the second in a series of weekend walk-outs by members of Aslef, was expected to affect more than 100,000 passengers.
10, is tough material, a play likely to polarize audiences across gender lines and almost guaranteed to prompt walk-outs.
During the latter period, in addition to outright violence and coercion, the military governments massively "intervened" in the labor movement (replacing its leadership with new officials appointed by the Ministry of Labor), banned strikes almost entirely, and suppressed news reports of the few walk-outs (mostly illegal) which did take place.