National Labor Relations Act

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National Labor Relations Act

Legislation in the United States, passed in 1935, that protects workers from employer retaliation if they form a labor union. It prohibits employers from coercing employees into refraining from organizing. It also prohibits employers from discriminating against employees who argue publicly in favor or against organizing and requires companies to negotiate with employee representatives. It requires each unit of employees to be represented only by one organization. The Act created the National Labor Relations Board, which investigates and enforces potential violations. It is also called the Wagner Act.
References in periodicals archive ?
The passage of the National Labor Relations Act (Wagner Act) in 1935 has become a pivot for intense scholarly debates on the role of the state in supporting working-class aspirations with opinions diverging from championing the NLRA as the touchstone of legislative reform to denunciations that it was merely a scheme to entice working-class demobilization.
("the Wagner Act"), (26) hoped by the legislation to promote
Canadian labour law is predicated on the Wagner Act model and its twin pillars of majoritarianism and exclusivity.
After the 1932 election, Congress passed the Wagner Act, which established the rights of unions to organize and strike and created employer unfair labor practices.
For a discussion of how employer advocacy and court and congressional action helped push the system in the direction of private ordering in the years after the Wagner Act, see infra notes 61-77 and accompanying text.
sense among legal scholars that the Wagner Act (86) model was--for
This coming July will mark the 80th anniversary of the passage of the Wagner Act, signed into law by President Roosevelt in 1935.
I believe that the Wagner Act is Exhibit 1 for many radicals and liberals looking back on the successes and failures of the New Deal and of their own lives.
Their struggles with loyalty investigations comprise the middle two of seven chapters, but their lives are woven throughout the study, beginning with Mary spearheading the League of Women Shoppers in the 1936 test case that validated the Wagner Act her husband wrote.
He also might have explored the role played by Louis Brandeis and Louis Marshall, like Schiff assimilated German Jews, who settled the 1910 cloakmakers' strike through principles subsequently enacted into law by the New Deal Wagner Act.
Specifically, the union wants to use the force of government, mainly the Wagner Act, to coerce some people to join unions and to coerce business owners to "bargain" with unions under threat of government penalties if the owners do not concede to union demands.
What Bianchi and Stephenson ignore is that leisure and tourism were answers formulated by the capital-owners to unionization and the 1935 Wagner Act (3) in the U.S.