Double Dip Recession

(redirected from W-Shaped Recovery)

Double Dip Recession

A long-term macroeconomic trend characterized by a recession, a recovery, then another recession. For example, the United States economy entered a recession in 1929, which continued until 1933. Recovery continued until 1937, at which point a second recession began. Double-dip recessions often have weak recoveries in between the recessions (though the example above included some years of very strong growth); analysts therefore tend to worry about a double-dip recession when a recovery is weak.
References in periodicals archive ?
"DIB is headed for a W-shaped recovery and may recover to hit its previous high of Dh5.90 in the medium term," Shiv Prakash, senior analyst with First Abu Dhabi Bank Securities said in a note.
There is a lot of debate about what kind of recovery we will have--a V-shaped recovery or a W-shaped recovery. There is debate about the ability to sustain the current monetary policies of low interest rates, taking into account the lack of liquidity.
If we cannot, there will be inflationary pressures and then it may be a W-shaped recovery, not a V-shaped recovery.
Corporate boardrooms may become risk-averse again if they feel a W-shaped recovery is becoming likely amid high unemployment, household deleveraging and continued dependence on transitory stimulus measures.
Local analysts say a W-shaped recovery -during which a return to growth is followed by another fall in output -is a distinct possibility.
With western economies less sure of the shape of recovery (there have been talk of J, L or W-shaped recovery), major markets for India's exports aren't going to start generating big demand soon.
So rather than getting a V-shaped recovery you get a U or even W-shaped recovery in which case the likelihood is that ...
"However, entering a W-shaped recovery could become a real possibility if businesses are overly optimistic in their planning and forecasting.
regulators are likely to back down from the tough stance they took a month ago on rules for auctions of troubled banks, which could clear the way for more private equity bidders to come back into the game.Huntsman CEO worries about W-shaped recovery.