Vredeling Directive

Vredeling Directive

a draft directive of the European Union (EU) concerning DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION and CONSULTATION with employees. Named after the former European Union Commissioner Henk Vredeling, it proposes that employee representatives have rights to information concerning the organization's structure, its financial situation, investment plans and employment prospects. It also proposes that management plans which are likely to have serious consequences for the workforce should be the subject of meaningful consultation. This directive, originally formulated in the early 1980s, has not been adopted by the EU, in part because of resistance by the UK Government.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the Vredeling Directive to the European works councils Directive.
The other two countries, which do not have general or formal provisions for information and consultation, will be allowed two more years to apply the law to companies with 100 workers or more, and another two years after that to reach the 50 worker threshold (a total of seven years).The first proposal for a Directive on worker consultation dates back to the 1970s (the ill-fated Vredeling Directive).
The Commission tabled its amended proposal at the end of 1998 after more than 20 years of deadlock on worker consultation laws (the defunct Vredeling Directive) and the worker participation Directive (draft 5th Company Law Directive), largely as a result of the wide gaps in industrial relations laws between EU countries, not least Germany and the UK.