Paradox of Voting

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Paradox of Voting

The idea that because the physical process of voting is inconvenient and each vote usually matters very little, the rational person should not vote. Yet large proportions of populations vote. The paradox occurs if one studies voters and other political actors in the same way as one would study rational economic actors.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The answer is simple: you were the victim of a jury voting paradox.
Katz's treatment of each of these types and of their internal consistencies and puzzles (the voting paradox under varieties of individualist popular sovereignty democracies) is astute, often enlightening, and consistently rigorous.
(6) This concept should not be confused with the so-called "voting paradox".
I found some confusion in defining the Condorcet score and explaining the Voting Paradox on pages 39-40.
Why so many voters go to the polls is called "the voting paradox."
The result is the classic "voting paradox," first recognized by the Marquis de Condorcet in 1785 but largely forgotten until Arrow revived it.
Decision-Theoretic Paradoxes as Voting Paradoxes, RACHAEL BRIGGS
"An Approach to Empirical Measures of Voting Paradoxes." Public Choice 36 (1981): 193-194.