Volost


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Volost

In Imperial Russia, a political subdivision roughly equivalent to a county that was abolished in the 1920s after the rise of the Soviet Union.
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References in periodicals archive ?
One traveler told of meeting him on a steamer when he was on his way to investigate a murder, together with a clerk from the volost' where the crime had been committed.
Rather, they turned to the established village administrative institutions, the volost courts and land captains, to resolve their disputes.
Second, as Rempel explained, "wherever an ethnic or denominational group of colonists, comprising a varying number of communities, had constituted a separate administrative district, this unit of local self-government was left intact." The name of the unit may have been changed to the Russian term volost' (canton), and official communication with the authorities was now in Russian rather than German, but its "autonomous status in regard to purely local issues concerning education, health, welfare, insurance, etc., was left largely undisturbed." (45)
(12) Calling for freedom of the press and of conscience, as well as a basic national education system, Arsen'ev also demanded the lowering of property requirements for zemstvo elections and the creation of the all-estate volost', a local administrative unit smaller than the zemstvo that would serve as a grassroots peasant-dominated institution.
Ianin claimed that the trouble began when the secretary of the Pitelinskii district party committee was replaced by one Fediaev "who was considered a talentless worker even in the volost' (district)." According to Ianin's recollection, the new chairman of the district soviet executive committee was a "mediocre" member of the local police, one Subbotin, who had been transferred to Pitelino from Shatsk--in other words, both incompetent and an outsider.
A number of scholars have used volost' courts to show how rural lower-class residents engaged actively and meaningfully with state structures.
[2] This is hard to reconcile with the author's statement that volost' county clerks "were often the only literate figures within township administrations (especially before the 1890's)" (p.
In 1782, Count James Bruce, governor-general of Novgorod and Tver', reported to the Senate on an event in the village of Valukhino in Vaksalovskaia Canton (volost').
For state peasants, the volost' (subdistrict), consisting of a group of villages, was the basic unit.