volatile

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Volatility

A measure of a security's stability. It is calculated as the standard deviation from a certain continuously compounded return over a given period of time. It is an important measure in quantifying risk; for example, a security with a volatility of 50% is considered very high risk because it has the potential to increase or decrease up to half its value. Volatility may influence the type of investments one makes: one may directly invest in non-volatile securities, such as a certificate of deposit, but highly volatile securities lend themselves more to short selling and other forms of hedging.

volatile

Tending to be subject to large price fluctuations. Traders generally prefer volatile securities if they buy and sell on short-term price movements. See also beta.
References in periodicals archive ?
Silage volatile fatty acids (VFA) of sole and intercropped corn and soybean as influenced by crop combination ratio
We have also shown that SOTE contain the concentration of tannins that may have antimethanogenic properties, but only at the higher doses even when expressed per units of total gas production or volatile fatty acids whereas no changes occur when calculated per g of in vitro dry matter digestibility.
The volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrationThe plasma VFA concentrations of portal, hepatic veins and femoral artery are given in the Table II.
Effects of glucose and volatile fatty acids on blood ghrelin concentrations in calves before and after weaning.
Rumen fermentation, bacterial and total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) production rates in cattle fed on urea-molasses-mineral block licks supplement.
Net metabolism of volatile fatty acids D-AY-hydroxybutyrate nonesterified fatty acids and blood gasses by portal-drained viscera and liver of lactating Holstein cows.
Some LA-rich oils and free LA inhibited ruminal methanogenesis and increased volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, especially propionate in a culture with ground corn.
Thereafter, the fermentation fluid was centrifuged (3,000 rpm, 15 min), and samples of the supernatant stored at -20[degrees]C for volatile fatty acid (VFA) and ammonia-N analyses.
Feeding whole (Petit et al., 2002), rolled or extruded (Doreau et al., 2009) linseed had no effect on ruminal concentrations of ammonia N, and total and individual volatile fatty acids, thus explaining the general lack of effect on dry matter intake.