volatile

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Volatility

A measure of a security's stability. It is calculated as the standard deviation from a certain continuously compounded return over a given period of time. It is an important measure in quantifying risk; for example, a security with a volatility of 50% is considered very high risk because it has the potential to increase or decrease up to half its value. Volatility may influence the type of investments one makes: one may directly invest in non-volatile securities, such as a certificate of deposit, but highly volatile securities lend themselves more to short selling and other forms of hedging.

volatile

Tending to be subject to large price fluctuations. Traders generally prefer volatile securities if they buy and sell on short-term price movements. See also beta.
References in periodicals archive ?
1,2,8) In addition to the immediate termination of a volatile anesthetic, other management steps include the commencement of mechanical ventilation with 100% oxygen at a flow rate greater than 10 L/min, normalization of metabolic derangements, and a lowering of body temperature with topical ice or ice-water lavage.
Doi M and Ikeda K, (1993), Airway irritation produced by volatile anesthetics during brief inhalation- comparision of halothane, Enflurane, Sevoflurane and isoflurane, Canadian journal of anesthesia, 40: 122-126.
In the presence of a volatile anesthetic mixture, electrocautery can result in the ignition of plastic, rubber, paper, and other combustible or flammable materials.
Widespread availability of modern clear plastic masks along with non-pungent and rapidly acting volatile anesthetic has made inhalational induction an option even in adults.
Volatile anesthetic requirements differ in mice selectively bred for sensitivity or resistance to diazepam: implications for the site of anesthesia.
It is exciting to work with this new concept and we have great expectations about the studies we will perform with the rapid fresh gas flow and rapid volatile anesthetic delivery.
Volatile anesthetics and liver injury: a clinical update or what every anesthesiologist should know.
Clinicians concerned about nausea and vomiting should thus avoid volatile anesthetics rather than avoiding nitrous oxide.