volatile

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Volatility

A measure of a security's stability. It is calculated as the standard deviation from a certain continuously compounded return over a given period of time. It is an important measure in quantifying risk; for example, a security with a volatility of 50% is considered very high risk because it has the potential to increase or decrease up to half its value. Volatility may influence the type of investments one makes: one may directly invest in non-volatile securities, such as a certificate of deposit, but highly volatile securities lend themselves more to short selling and other forms of hedging.
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volatile

Tending to be subject to large price fluctuations. Traders generally prefer volatile securities if they buy and sell on short-term price movements. See also beta.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were no significant differences between both volatile anesthetics in terms of intensive care unit length of stay (SMD -0.07, 95% CI -0.38 to 0.24, P = 0.66; Figure 2), hospital length of stay (SMD 0.06, 95% CI -0.33 to 0.45, P = 0.76; Figure 3), time to extubation (SMD 0.29, 95% CI -0.08 to 0.65, P = 0.12; Figure 4), S100[beta] (at the end of surgery: SMD 0.08, 95% CI -0.33 to 0.49, P = 0.71; 24 hours after surgery: SMD 0.21, 95% CI -0.23 to 0.65, P = 0.34; Figure 5), or troponin (at the end of surgery: SMD -1.13, 95% CI -2.39 to 0.13, P = 0.08; 24 hours after surgery: SMD 0.74, 95% CI -0.15 to 1.62, P = 0.10; Figure 6).
As is true for the other volatile anesthetics, postoperative nausea and vomiting is a significant adverse effect during the early stages of recovery (29) and is one of the main drawbacks of volatile inhalants compared to the propofol alternative.
(1,5,8) Fulminant malignant hyperthermic crises occur in 6.5% of all cases; the calculated incidence of these crises is 1 in 84,000 following the administration of volatile anesthetics and 1 in 62,000 following the administration of succinylcholine.
(8.) Doi M and Ikeda K, (1993), Airway irritation produced by volatile anesthetics during brief inhalation- comparision of halothane, Enflurane, Sevoflurane and isoflurane, Canadian journal of anesthesia, 40: 122-126.
Widespread availability of modern clear plastic masks along with non-pungent and rapidly acting volatile anesthetic has made inhalational induction an option even in adults.
Cell culture experiments confirm that10,11 volatile anesthetics (isoflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane) can induce apoptosis and increase the formation of beta-amyloid protein.
Effect of volatile anesthetics on respiratory system resistance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
So, in this study it was decided to take blood samples at the same time of the insufflation and the postdeflation for all patients because it was planned not to compare the open procedure with laparoscopic surgery to compare the volatile anesthetics.
Similarly, the recently introduced volatile anesthetics, especially isoflurane allows less side effects on cardiovascular, renal and hepatic system (Asokan et al., 2006).