dysfunction

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Related to Vocal Cord Dysfunction: Vocal cord paralysis, vocal cord nodules

dysfunction

any consequence of an activity which inhibits the achievement of the desired objective. In the study of ORGANIZATIONS, dysfunctions refer to those aspects of organizations which are essential to the organization's proper functioning but at the same time detract from organizational performance. For instance, a justifiable emphasis on following the correct procedures can also stifle the flexibility that is often needed in work situations. See GOAL DISPLACEMENT.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson
References in periodicals archive ?
"Vocal Cord Dysfunction is a disorder where the vocal cords want to close, so it makes it difficult for the child to breathe," says Dianne Hollinger, a speech therapist at Wellspan Health in York, Pennsylvania.
Major Finding: Out of 100 vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) patients, 86 were women, 68 were overweight, and 50 had psychiatric conditions; 26 had mistakenly been diagnosed with asthma.
Although there are anaesthetic contraindications to sedation in patients with suspected airway obstruction, this can be a useful discriminator between PVCM and organic vocal cord dysfunction (6,16,22).
Eucalyptus as a specific irritant causing vocal cord dysfunction. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2004;93:299-303.
Portnoy, who directs the allergy and asthma section at Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, Missouri, also advises that children diagnosed with exercise-induced asthma may actually have another condition called vocal cord dysfunction (VCD).
For the client presenting with vocal cord dysfunction, speech therapy should be initiated to optimally recover function.
In literature, there are cases in which vocal cord dysfunction was seen after end tracheal intubation during general anesthesia but we did not find such case9,10.
The list of upper airways disorders that can be mistaken for asthma includes vocal cord dysfunction, infection, laryngeal spasm, and laryngeal edema secondary to angioedema.
These included tracheal stenosis requiring surgical resection and dilation (two patients), disability from heterotopic ossification of the knees and elbows (four patients), frozen shoulder (two patients), vocal cord dysfunction and voice changes (one patient), reactive airway disease (four patients), and dental implants after tooth damage acquired in the ICU (one patient).
In contrast, vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) is a more recently recognized condition that affects perhaps 2%-5% of young athletes.
Particular mention needs to be made of vocal cord dysfunction. This most commonly occurs in asthmatics and can be very difficult to treat.