vicarious liability

(redirected from Vicariously liable)
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Contingent Liability

A liability that a company may have to pay, but only if a certain future event occurs. Usually, a contingent liability refers to the outcome of a lawsuit: that is, the company may have to pay a significant amount of money if it loses the lawsuit. Contingent liabilities are recorded under accounts payable; their existence may also affect the share price.

vicarious liability

see TORT.

vicarious liability

The legal principle that persons who are in a position to control the actions of another will be held liable for any injuries caused by that other person.Liability does not rely on proving there was improper training, instructions, control, or supervision. Rather, it is imposed merely because of the relationship between the parties.Respondeat superior is one type of vicarious liability. In real estate, the concept is most often encountered in claims against an employer (construction contractor, property manager, and sometimes even real estate brokers) for the discriminatory actions of an employee.

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Stinson also argues, "It is axiomatic that in order for Stinson to be vicariously liable for the actions of Stinson Communications LLC, the LLC must be named as a defendant." On the contrary, plaintiffs regularly bring claims against parties on the basis of vicarious liability without naming the directly liable party as a defendant.
The diocese and the parish argue that they "are not vicariously liable" for the alleged actions of Morton and/or the alleged damages being claimed by Moore.
However, the appellate court continued, it was not against public policy to allow one who was only "vicariously liable" for punitive damages to shift the burden of satisfying the judgment to an insurer.
If a public health official who is held personally liable by the court cannot afford to compensate the harmed patient in full, the patient may always cite the relevant provincial MEC for health or Minister of Health as a joint wrongdoer vicariously liable to pay the balance.
(collectively, Domino's), on the grounds that Domino's did not have the power to control day-to-day operations at Sui Juris; rather, Sui Juris, as the franchisee, had the power to hire, fire and train employees, and therefore Domino's could not be vicariously liable for the alleged harassment.
The judgment re-establishes that the directors and the shareholders cannot be made vicariously liable in criminal matters.
The Court of Appeal disagreed, explaining that "an insurer, as a principal, may be vicariously liable for the torts of its agent if the insurer directed or authorized the agent to perform the tortious acts, or if it ratifies the acts it did not originally authorize." However, unlike an agent, "a broker does not act for the insurer, and the insurer is not liable for the broker's acts or omissions."
The law firms are "vicariously liable" for the negligence of Shelton, and Shelton should repay all she gets as well, according to the complaint, which was first filed in August in state Superior Court, but has since been moved to federal court, thanks to a motion made by the Chicago firm's lawyer, John C.
A federal court in Arizona has agreed with a growing number of jurisdictions that a franchisor is vicariously liable for the actions of its franchisee only if the franchisor exerts control over the very instrumentality that caused the alleged harm.
But judges concluded there was no link between McCulloch's conduct and his job which could make bosses"vicariously liable".
Chief Judge Royce Lamberth ruled that Syria was vicariously liable for the terrorist PKK's 1991 kidnapping of a group of American biblical archaeologists leading an excavation in Turkey.
The court granted the plaintiff's petition for review to resolve the question of when a nonnegligent person or entity may be held vicariously liable on an apparent agency theory for physical injuries negligently inflicted by a medical professorial.