venire

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venire

The total pool of people summoned for jury duty.

References in periodicals archive ?
L'andera parte, che fatto venite dimane mattina il Podesta di quella Terra al Tribunal di li Capi di questo Cons.
Su ultima y muy breve misiva (no 13), escrita el dia de la Ascension ya con la vista puesta en el cercano reencuentro, es una sucesion de mensajes casi telegraficos punteados por un venite adoremus que se repite salmodicamente tras cada uno de ellos.
Stylistically, the scoring is typically Elizabethan (although so early in her reign that can hardly have been codified), yet the perceived gulf between the First and Second Services is based more on the hitherto available editions of the respective evening canticles (that of the First Service--an unreliable edition by Simkins, that of the Second Service--which is reliable--by Wulstan) than on a truer comparison of the Nunc Dimittis of the First Service and the Venite of the Second, when the gulf narrows considerably.
Some use was made of the trilingual service book of the World Student Christian Federation, Venite Adoremus,(23) as well as the WSCF hymnbook Cantate Domino, which had hymns in three or more languages.
nella tempesta anche dio vi abbandona e venite dagli uomini, che volete?
Cum venit, aut pro cum venite sit adverbium temporis, pro dum; nec enim potest coniunctivi modi particula iungi indicativo.
In fata unor acuzatii si presiuni venite din partea aliatilor sai din Est, ca si a statelor arabe, Romania nu si-a schimbat linia de conduita.
Possible parallels in the Venite, Benedicite, or Third Collect to details in Herbert's poem are very general and limited, compared to the specific ones I have noted.
Several rarities were included in conductor Paul Spicer's menu, beginning with some early Mozart sacred miniatures, featuring the exhilarating eight-part Venite, populi.
And ultimately the publication made its own modest contribution to LBW, for, in addition to many hymns and settings, both the Offertory "What shall I render to the Lord" from the Eucharist and the Venite "O come, let us sing to the Lord" from the Morning Service were subsequently taken into LBW, with slight modifications because of textual variants.