VAT

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VAT

Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

VAT

1. GOST 7.67 Latin three-letter geocode for the Vatican. The code is used for transactions to and from Vatican bank accounts and for international shipping to the Vatican. As with all GOST 7.67 codes, it is used primarily in Cyrillic alphabets.

2. See: Value-added tax.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

VAT

Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

VAT

see VALUE-ADDED TAX.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

VAT

see VALUE-ADDED TAX.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(18) For an old, but still relevant discussion of the vates concept in Augustan poetry, see Newman 1967.
to the vates as a payment for his song she herself comes.
The vates has become a merchant who offers his wares for a specific price.
Humor and incongruity distinguish the appearances of vates in two other programmatic poems that replay the themes of Amores 1.1 and 2.1.
triumphat Amor), the domina iniqua holds a powerful position in her line, and both me and vates receive emphasis in their lines.
The humor of the poem appears in the scenario that carefully prepares us for an epiphany (1-6) and the ironic juxtaposition of the descriptions of the two contenders (7-14), who resemble physically the genres they represent.(15) Tragedy derides the erotic vates and his genre: saepe aliquis digito vatem designat euntem / atque ait "hic, hic est, quem ferus urit Amor" ("Often someone with a finger points out the vates as he passes, / and says, 'Here, here he is whom Love torments,'" 19-20).
The humor darkens in two other elegies that refine how Ovid's erotic vates fits his notion of the function of elegy.
(5.) With two exceptions, vates in Propertius' poetry refers to traditional seers and teachers.
(9.) Lyne 185 distinguishes between the poet as sacerdos and the poet as vates. Ovid employs sacerdotal language again at Amores 3.8.23-24.
(14.) Later, in Amores 2.18.35-36, Ovid insists that erotic themes are appropriate to the war poetry of Macer (the addressee of this poem), whom Ovid calls a vates.
(23.) In another context, Ahern 44-48 demonstrates that Ovid plays with the idea of vates in the opening lines of the Ars Amatoria by combining "prophetic authority" and "empirical method."
(24.) In these poems Ovid invokes the vates of old, only to call them liars.