Access

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Related to Vascular access: Vascular Access Device

Access

The ability or authority to view restricted data or enter a restricted area.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Dialysis Vascular Access Coalition (DVAC) is a consortium of medical specialty societies, physicians, and non-hospital outpatient centers that provide vascular access services to individuals with advanced chronic kidney disease and End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD).
A vascular access coordinator improves the prevalent fstula rate.
A sample of physician experts belonging to the North American Australian Vascular Access Consortium (NAAVAC) was also invited to participate.
Influence of Vascular Access Type on Sex and Ethnicity-Related Mortality in Hemodialysis-Dependent Patients.
The basic indication for angioplasty of AVF or AVG in a HD patient is when there is stenosis > 50% of lumen's diameter which is accompanied by previous thrombosis, increased venous pressure during HD, worsening laboratory findings such as hyperkalemia and uremia, diminished murmur on auscultation of the vascular access, and finally drop of blood flow in color Doppler of the site [4].
During normal course of HD procedure patients are exposed to several infection risks; potential sources of infection include the skin (through repeated disruption of the skin barriers and integrity by the vascular access), contamination of dialysis equipment and medication vails and inadequate dialyzer reuse (4).
The company said the CIRM grant "further validates the potential of our bioengineered human acellular vessel's capabilities as a more durable and safe vascular access option for patients requiring dialysis treatment."
The trial is investigating the potential of Humacyte's Humacyl blood vessels to improve vascular access for hemodialysis patients with end-stage renal disease.
A natural radial-cephalic arteriovenous vascular access was created 3 months after that.
Among the 223 patients, 69.95% (156) of the patients had undergone AAVF procedure elsewhere and were referred to this department for revision and developing vascular access (Table 3).
This paper had several illustrative diagrams and photographs of the surgical procedure required for this uncommon vascular access. This paper details how the buttonhole method can be implemented in patients with limited vascular access and poor cardiac function.