biodiversity

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biodiversity

the variety of plant and animal life in a particular area. Environmentalists have expressed concern about the extent to which ECONOMIC GROWTH, in particular modern methods of farming, forestry and manufacturing, has reduced biodiversity, with some plant and animal species becoming rare or extinct. See POLLUTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Again, the ESA stresses the functional value of biodiversity and ecosystems.
These include: incomplete scientific knowledge of the current status of biodiversity, a lack of effective tools to classify and map different types of ecosystems, lack of consistent methods for monitoring the changes in biodiversity, barriers to information sharing, lack of resources and capacity for the management of resources and biodiversity issues, and lastly, a lack of valuation methods with which to ascertain the true value of biodiversity to enable the development of incentive mechanisms to reward sympathetic management of biodiversity (Department of Conservation & Ministry for the Environment, 2000).
While our understanding of the value of biodiversity has improved in recent years, so too has our appreciation of significant threats to it.
Yet the wider economic, cultural and ecological value of biodiversity is rarely acknowledged in development plans, project documents, or aid proposals, even though the products and benefits provided by it, in the case of coastal vegetation alone, would be extremely expensive or impossible to replace with imported substitutes.
Second, they have to measurably increase the value of biodiversity.
It aims to help desicion-makers apply this knowledge to all that they do and to recognise the value of biodiversity to people everywhere.
Mosquitoes or their larvae are important components in the food chain that feeds birds and some fish, the authors say in this revised edition of their 2001 book about the value of biodiversity in nature and for technology.
It was observations of the value of biodiversity that led to today's preoccupation with cultural diversity.
gives greater recognition to the value of biodiversity conservation and ecological services
17) Olson states: "[T]he common enemy of conservationists and landowners is an economic system that fails to take into account the social value of biodiversity -- and even creates incentives to destroy biodiversity.
Markets, hierarchies, and the value of biodiversity
The first provides a good summary of the value of biodiversity and some programs to conserve it.