biodiversity

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biodiversity

the variety of plant and animal life in a particular area. Environmentalists have expressed concern about the extent to which ECONOMIC GROWTH, in particular modern methods of farming, forestry and manufacturing, has reduced biodiversity, with some plant and animal species becoming rare or extinct. See POLLUTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Again, the ESA stresses the functional value of biodiversity and ecosystems.
The rationale for adopting this approach is that legislation forms the primary protection mechanism to ensure the intrinsic value of biodiversity is conserved.
The third chapter "Biodiversity" defines concepts like bioregion, natural ecosystem and ecosystem services, and reveals a theoretical approach of how to recognize the intrinsic value of biodiversity and natural ecosystems, and how to protect and restore them.
The project was part of Westminster's Biodiversity Action Plan, which recognises the value of biodiversity in Westminster and aims to prevent the decline of, and improve conditions for, species and habitats that are a conservation priority.
The research is in line with the automaker's mid-term environmental action plan 'Nissan Green Program 2010.' It is aimed at identifying the ecosystem impact of the automotive industry and the value of biodiversity conservation.
The second, which will be presented during the conference of the parties on biodiversity (Bonn, 19-30 May) will be a report on the economic value of biodiversity losses.
Yet the wider economic, cultural and ecological value of biodiversity is rarely acknowledged in development plans, project documents, or aid proposals, even though the products and benefits provided by it, in the case of coastal vegetation alone, would be extremely expensive or impossible to replace with imported substitutes.
It aims to help desicion-makers apply this knowledge to all that they do and to recognise the value of biodiversity to people everywhere.
Second, they have to measurably increase the value of biodiversity. It's tough sledding.
Mosquitoes or their larvae are important components in the food chain that feeds birds and some fish, the authors say in this revised edition of their 2001 book about the value of biodiversity in nature and for technology.
It was observations of the value of biodiversity that led to today's preoccupation with cultural diversity.
-- gives greater recognition to the value of biodiversity conservation and ecological services