Value Judgment


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Value Judgment

A decision based on what one believes is the right thing to do. The value involved may come from any number of sources. For example, one may make an investment decision based on one's moral values, one's view of the macroeconomic situation, and/or one's willingness to take risks. Often, value judgments occur when the correct decision is not immediately clear.
References in periodicals archive ?
Third, there has been intermittent support for the proposition that the exercise of a 'discretion' should be distinguished from the making of a 'value judgment'.
If for factual statements likely proof of truth restricting freedom of expression is justified by the evidence itself, aiming to protect the interests of another, when issuing a value judgment, which means the expression of ideas that belong to the perfectionist values of a person, does not justify restricting freedom of expression.
Max Weber had, according to Ropke, provided a useful critique of those who engaged in an "indiscriminate use of value judgments." (10) Here Ropke appeared to be referring to two things.
The third strategy consists in the use of metaphorical expressions or the comparison with entities that are prototypically bound to a specific value judgment. The clearest case is Monti's comparison of Berlusconi with the Pied Piper (3a), who is prototypically considered to be a deceiver, a person luring people to a disaster.
However, the new welfare economists argued that a public policy is justifiable, without any value judgment, if a potential Pareto improvement is generated--that is, if it brings society to a new utility frontier, such as [U.sub.2][U.sub.2]', where a redistribution, whether or not it is feasible or desirable, can potentially make everybody not worse off: In their opinion, we can separate value-free efficiency (the move from [E.sub.1] to [U.sub.2][U.sub.2]') and distribution issues (the exact point on [U.sub.2][U.sub.2]' to which redistribution brings society, whether or not that point is on segment VW).
Value judgments are substantive claims, and so presumably aren't analytic; but there doesn't seem to be any way to test them empirically, so they must not be synthetic either.
It is true, however, that broad general, value judgment questions will often elicit perfunctory responses from most people.
"She didn't mean it as a value judgment, but I was thinking that we had done our budget for the general convention and we had spent between $24 and $26 million (U.S.) renovating our headquarters in New York."
Chapter 2 declares a need to redefine classic from its current use as a value judgment to that of a period (1830-1860), a thematic focus (the individual in opposition to slavery), and a "means to distinguish book-length, sell-authored, antebellum slave narratives from those that precede or follow them." However, this noble purpose is mitigated a bit by the chapter's structure which discusses "The Critics and Douglass's 1845 Narrative," then lumps together Jacobs's Incidents and texts by Brown, Pennington, Bibb, and Craft as "Other Configurations of the 'Classic' Slave Narrative."
If one accepts the value judgment in this comparison, it is actually a very good one.
Unable to make any kind of value judgment about the individual characters, the viewer is left with a rather eerie exercise in style, a film which shows a talent, but one which is not very user-friendly.
Beyond the problem of quantifying harm, the comparison of different types of harm is an ongoing point of contention in the drug control debate, since the question whether one type of harm is greater than another is largely a value judgment.