Utilitarianism

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Related to Utilitarian ethics: Kantian ethics, Deontological ethics

Utilitarianism

The philosophy holding that moral actions must provide the greatest good to the greatest number of persons. Utilitarianism emphasizes the consequences of actions when evaluating their morality. For example, a utilitarian may regard a lie to a regulator as moral if it saves 2,000 jobs. Critics of utilitarianism contend that consequences are unknowable and argue that it could be used to defend atrocities. Utilitarians, on the other hand, argue that their philosophy is the best way to improve happiness in the aggregate.
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From the above analysis it can be deduced that individualistic utilitarian ethics and narrowly conceived concepts of development based on the primacy of capital accumulation do not resolve the antinomy of technical and scientific progress and social equality.
* Recall and understand several approaches to professional ethics, including utilitarian ethics, virtue-based ethical theory, and moral motivation theory.
A follow-up study conducted a decade later (Premeaux, 2004) found that while managers generally continued to apply utilitarian ethics, there was a shift toward duty, perhaps because of the possible punishment that could result if they took an unethical path.
(2009), "Analyzing Insider Trading from the Perspectives of Utilitarian Ethics and Rights Theory," Journal of Business Ethics 91: 65-82.
Both schools of thought apply a version of utilitarian ethics and both views are deficient, for at least two reasons.
The fact that the individuals who do so might act from the perspective of greed rather than altruism is irrelevant from the perspective of utilitarian ethics because the result is still a positive-sum game regardless of motive (Kant would disagree.
Spencer insists that human society thus evolves toward a peaceful state of optimal adaptation of the human species by means of the development and transmission of instincts of altruism and justice, and that this state can also be anticipated and promoted by a rational utilitarian ethics. Fornari maintains that Nietzsche appropriated from Spencer the idea of the evolutionary transmission of values through instincts, and thus abandoned his earlier, Ree-influenced claims about the origins of moral errors in forgetfulness and his interest in distinguishing egoistic and altruistic motivations.
I worry that McIntyre has not considered that this ideal may require that his utilitarian ethics would lead us to justify genocide (to eliminate war), parental licenses (to reduce poverty by preventing overpopulation), or a police state (to reduce crime) among other questionable solutions.
Utilitarian ethics hold that "the rightness of an action entirely depends on the value of its consequences, and that the usefulness can be rationally estimated" (About, 2006).
Introduction to Mill's Utilitarian Ethics. By Henry R.
championed utilitarian ethics. An action is right and good, they