Uruguay Round


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Uruguay Round

A series of meetings between more than 120 countries between 1986 and 1994. The round created the World Trade Organization and required signatories to reduce trade barriers on agricultural products, which before then had been subject to significant subsidization.
References in periodicals archive ?
High midnight in Brussels: an analysis of the September 1993 council meeting on the GATT Uruguay Round.
The Uruguay Round and its six-year phase-in period provide a strong example of what the reduction of trade barriers can do for exports.
Indeed, after the Uruguay Round there was a clear understanding that there would be a move to liberalise global agricultural trade but after Cancun there was a strong sense that the US reneged on that commitment.
Article 'Trims, Development Aspects and General Agreement', ublished in Uruguay Round, UN 90.
In many developing countries the opposition has centered on the Uruguay Round requirements that all WTO members afford certain intellectual property rights to foreign companies.
Under the Uruguay Round Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (SPS Agreement), regulatory requirements that differ from Codex standards may be challenged as trade barriers.
Additionally, the author explains how the Uruguay Round established a new organization, the World Trade Organization (WTO), whose mission was to overcome most of GATT's birth defects.
Europe We have seen how the limits on subsidised exports, as agreed under the Uruguay round, have already placed considerable pressure on commodity products, for example: cereals, beef, skimmed milk powder.
While backing the Uruguay Round formula that combines average and minimum rates for item-by-item tariff reductions, Tokyo has refrained from indicating specific figures in part to wait for exporting countries to first make concessions.
Citing such reasons, Japan has protected its rice market, charging tariffs equivalent to 490% following its concessions under the 1986-1994 Uruguay Round to accept imports if such high duties are paid.
Businesses in many developing countries were not satisfied with the results of the Uruguay Round.