tract

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Related to Urogenital tract: Genitourinary tract, Genitourinary organs

tract

A parcel of real estate; usually refers to a large area of land.

References in periodicals archive ?
rhamnosus), for oral administration to support women's urogenital tract health.
fermentans, a species isolated from the urogenital tract in the early 50s but considered infrequent in this site, was isolated from Kaposi's sarcoma lesions of a patient with AIDS and finally classified as the incognitus strain of M.
Situation changes in the mild form of PVI, when the frequency of detection of all groups of microorganisms from the urogenital tract is virtually equalized and varies from 27.5 [+ or -] 3.0 to 59.6 [+ or -] 4.5% ([chi square] = 0.62, p> 0.05).
The animals were sacrificed after examining LPPs, morphology of the urogenital tract, and plasma estradiol levels, and the urethras were removed for immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis.
The regions include the digestive tract, mouth, skin, nose, and female urogenital tract. Next, various other NIH-funded projects plan to sample microbiomes from volunteers with specific diseases.
Samples will be grown in laboratories and collected from the digestive tract, mouth, skin, nose and female urogenital tract regions of volunteers.
Furthermore, a composition comprising the bacterial strains and a sanitary article comprising the bacterial strains, such as a tampon, for prophylaxis and/or treatment of infections of the urogenital tract, are described.
Other defects are those of the head and face, digits, urogenital tract, and mental and physical growth.
Mice were examined daily for premature vaginal opening for the first 35 days of life and checked monthly with blunt forceps to detect concretions (calcium carbonate deposits in the vagina that are a result of malformation of the urogenital tract in developmentally estrogenized animals).
OTTAWA--The list of pathogens that produce clinically significant disease in the female urogenital tract should be expanded to include Mycoplasma pneumoniae.
First infections usually occur in childhood (age 3-4 years) via the respiratory route, and the virus remains latent in the urogenital tract. The primary infection is generally asymptomatic, but when symptoms occur they are fever and a nonspecific upper respiratory infection (Reploeg, Storch, & Clifford, 2001).
Numerous other associated abnormalities such as lacrimal duct and urogenital tract abnormalities have been described.