Upswing


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Upswing

(1) An upward turn in a security's price after a period of flat or falling prices (market bottom). (2) The period during which a security's price trends upwards.

Upswing

A situation in which a security or stock market increases in price after a period of falling or flat prices. An upswing often refers to a short-term gain, but this is not always the case. See also: Bull market.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, the most recent housing market upswing started from a high level of real house prices relative to history.
At the same time, there has been a big upswing in seismic activity in the North Sea this year.
" The Volkswagen group is benefiting disproportionately from the upswing in the most important car markets, " Martin Winterkorn said reported Reuters.
Dawn Humphries, communication manager at FNB, said: "during the last couple of weeks FNB has once again been alerted to an upswing in attempts of fraudulent activities, be it card swopping or cloning, internet phishing or identity theft."
Mr King added: "Pump prices remain precarious with the possibility of a new upswing, and it will be bad timing if the 1p-a-litre fuel duty increase in October coincides with another pounds 1 on the cost of a tank of petrol."
Decline 22% No Change 23% Upswing 55% 2008 WIFS outlook for profitability of the California wine industry during the next two years Note: Table made from pie chart.
Key 10-year JGB yield rises in morning on stocks' upswing
"I think these incidents may be on the upswing," says Cohen.
What makes this and each impending upswing stand out is the increasingly finite amount of developable land.
With new investments, rising employment, and an improving stock market, Langberg believes the industry is in the beginnings of a new upswing.
To measure the inflationary impact of excess demand during an upswing in the business cycle, the output gap, (y - [bar.y])[.sup.upswing], takes the value of zero when the output gap is negative and its actual (positive) value otherwise.
It seems more likely that a decline of total precipitation and humidity would be the direct cause of both temperature and fire incidence ("The Long Burn: Warming drove recent upswing in wildfires," SN: 7/8/06, p.