Uninsured

(redirected from Uninsured Persons)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Uninsured

Describing any person, property, business or anything else without an insurance policy. Some uninsured persons and things may be self-insured, in cases in which insurance is a poor financial decision because the responsible party has sufficient income or wealth to pay for whatever might happen. Most of the time, however, uninsured persons and items are very risky. In some circumstances, it is illegal to be without certain kinds of insurance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fries Taylor, Cunningham, & McKenzie (2006) highlight the approaches of individual communities to caring for uninsured persons.
Table 4 presents estimates for the sample of uninsured persons.
This will help reduce the possibility that a gap in coverage will occur as a separated employee seeks new insurance and will help control the number of uninsured persons in the population.
A high or rising uninsured rate within a community may result in allocation of public funds and staff resources away from public health programs that serve all members of the community and toward direct services delivery urgently needed by low income uninsured persons.
a 1935 70 1300 - 70% max 1936 69 1300 no surcharge - 1937 68 1300 - 70% max 1937 68 1300 no surcharge - 1950 55 1300 - 50% 1950 55 1300 no surcharge - Base Premium Premium After Premium After Year Plus Surcharge 30% Rebate New Rebate Born $ $ $ 1932 1300 910 780 1933 1300 910 780 1934 1300 910 780 1935 2210 1547 1326 1936 1300 910 845 1937 2210 1547 1437 1937 1300 910 845 1950 1950 1365 1365 1950 1300 910 910 Source: Author's calculations Table 2: Lifetime Health Cover surcharge, rebate offered and rebate required for uninsured persons to reduce costs to the level of those required to pay the surcharge, 2005 Lifetime Health Proposed Rebate Age Cover surcharge rebate offered %* required %** 73 n.
They show that it is inappropriate to evaluate alternative credit designs primarily on their effect on the number of uninsured persons.
All of the grant applications targeted access to health care to uninsured persons.
The drive for profit is compromising the quality of care, the number of uninsured persons is increasing, those with insurance are increasingly dissatisfied, bureaucracy is proliferating, and costs are again rapidly escalating.
Barriers to adequate health care is the subject of Chapter 3, which focuses in detail on delivery of health services, their costs, insured and uninsured persons, "safety nets," prenatal care, information and access impediments, and related subjects.
In clear nontechnical prose, they handle the three interrelated phenomena creating the crisis: the relentless increase in health care costs, the growing numbers of uninsured persons, and the growing destabilization of the system because of cost shifting.
8) If all families with incomes below 200% of the federal poverty level are included, close to 65% of all uninsured persons can be accounted for.
A substantial majority--85 percent--thought uninsured persons ineligible for Medicare or Medicaid ought to receive basic care.