Uninsured

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Uninsured

Describing any person, property, business or anything else without an insurance policy. Some uninsured persons and things may be self-insured, in cases in which insurance is a poor financial decision because the responsible party has sufficient income or wealth to pay for whatever might happen. Most of the time, however, uninsured persons and items are very risky. In some circumstances, it is illegal to be without certain kinds of insurance.
References in periodicals archive ?
A high or rising uninsured rate within a community may result in allocation of public funds and staff resources away from public health programs that serve all members of the community and toward direct services delivery urgently needed by low income uninsured persons. The redeployment of public health agency resources away from population health activities to provide personal health care services to uninsured residents, along with the general underutilization of and limited access to care by uninsured members of the community can fuel the spread of disease and undermine communicable disease control efforts, prevention activities, such as immunizations programs.
The government would end up saving about $5,000 per year per additional uninsured person.
For an uninsured person with a mental illness, the ER has become the new inpatient ward.
Let's presume that an uninsured person wants to use the exchange to get coverage for the whole family, and that insurance that was heretofore unaffordable is now within the family's budget.
Thus, an uninsured person newly diagnosed with both cancer and diabetes would be matched to an insured person with cancer and one other condition.
This session we sponsored Senate Bill 329, which would have allowed any uninsured person in Oregon to enroll in our drug purchasing program, thereby saving 40 percent to 60 percent on drug costs.
Using data primarily from the 2003 Community Tracking Study household survey, this paper examines how the structure and financing of the local safety net, as well as personal characteristics, affect whether an uninsured person pays a lower price at their regular source of care.
Local and state governments are also likely to be faced with heavier burdens of care for the uninsured, which may ultimately result in reduced government-provided health care per uninsured person (Thorpe 2004).
It is also important to point out that in comparing the results of our analysis with the earlier studies, the adjusted hazard ratio of death for an uninsured person of 1.25 (from Franks, Clancy, and Gold 1993) is not the same metric as the ratio of mortality rates by baseline insurance status.
In effect, the model hypothesizes that the shorter the distance between an uninsured person and a safety net provider, the greater the level of access to care.
Under the Health Insurance Act, uninsured persons on another basis are insured on income not less than half of the minimum monthly amount of insurable income for self-employed persons.