Uninsurable Risk

Uninsurable Risk

A risk against which one cannot purchase insurance, either because it is very likely to occur or because it would be too expensive to cover if it did. For example, a 118-year-old person may be an uninsurable risk for life insurance because the person is very likely to die before the insurer collects a sufficient amount in premiums. Likewise, one generally cannot insure against nuclear war because, even though nuclear war is unlikely, repairs and medical bills would be prohibitively expensive.
References in periodicals archive ?
A statement (or statements) from one or more Cypriot insurance companies confirming that landslide is an uninsurable risk.
With Doherty, he initiated this exploration by the profession by examining the role of an uninsurable risk on the demand for insurance to hedge another risk.
Historically, flood has been thought of as an uninsurable risk, and your only option as a homeowner or a renter has been to purchase coverage through the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP).
But just as talent is a competitive differentiator, it can also be a critical source of under-recognized, insufficiently controlled and often uninsurable risk.
The pivotal argument in this essay is that contemporary analytics of risk are preoccupied with incorporating uncertainty--a concept which Knight defined as uninsurable risk (1)--into formulations of risk, and that this necessarily gives rise to complex, archipelagic systems of simultaneously abstract (or mathematical) and physical dimensions.
This bespoke solution was designed to cover this traditionally uninsurable risk, which Roy Hill identified as a particular concern.
Conveyancers could be exposing themselves to liability by failing to obtain information about flooding, which is set to become the latest "uninsurable risk".
The price for not taking a highly aggressive loss-prevention approach to this largely uninsurable risk can have life-changing consequences for directors and executives, and can be costly for organizations, both financially and in the court of public opinion.
"After 9/11, there was a slowdown in commercial building because terrorism is an uninsurable risk. TRIA helped make terrorism insurance available and affordable.
Now I have long thought that there is no such thing as an uninsurable risk and I guess this would have been true in Llandudno had the club been prepared to pay an enormous sum.
Their findings suggest that, in general, when households face uninsurable risk in the returns to their human or physical capital, it is useful to tax the income from these factors and then rebate the proceeds via a lump-sum rebate.
For example, losses from terrorist attacks through nuclear, chemical, biological and radiation devices would be mostly covered by the government because it is an uninsurable risk. Other coverages, such as workers' compensation, would get some level of federal reinsurance, while some lines might receive no government coverage.