ASCII

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ASCII

American Standard Code for Information Exchange. A code that represents as a binary number each of the 128 letters, numbers, punctuation marks and other characters used in English. This was developed in the 1960s for telegraphs and is used in computing.

ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange)

a system for coding individual numbers, letters and punctuation marks which is widely used in COMPUTERS.
References in periodicals archive ?
8232;So if you want to convince the world it truly needs a pug emoji, or even a Sumerian diacritic mark, all you have to do is go before the elders of the Unicode Consortium and make your case.
In fact, Unicode doesn't really consider current trends when creating emoji lists, though the Consortium will take public suggestions for additions with each batch.
encouraging relevant organisations to do the conversion of Unicode material
The compression rate within Unicode based ordinary to ghost character is 30% to 35% more decrement out of given 80% to 85% range.
The Unicode Consortium is a non-profit organization founded to develop, extend and promote use of the Unicode Standard, which specifies the representation of text in modern software products and standards.
I am not sure if there is an "ideal" font for each language or for languages, since Unicode (and applications compliant with the standard) basically severed the ties between the font and any specific language.
This means the use of Unicode can eliminate character set variations across systems and fonts, avoiding the "alphabet soup" of multiple ISO 8858 ***8859?
Endeavor, an associate member of the Unicode Consortium (http://www.
Unicode has a role to play although there are very complex issues relating to format and structure of digital objects, interpretation of content, intellectual property management, perhaps even patents and other legal framework questions.
Now that these emojis are available on beta, it seems like emojis based on Unicode 9.
In an attempt to bring gender equality to the emojis that are beginning to dominate our everyday online conversations - so much so that the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year of 2015 was an emoji - the Unicode Consortium Thursday announced plans for 11 new "professional" emojis.