consumer protection

(redirected from Unfair or Deceptive Trade Practices)
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consumer protection

a generic term used to describe various pieces of legislation whose objective is to protect CONSUMERS from unscrupulous, unfair and intrusive trade practices and unsafe products. In the UK the main Acts concerning consumer protection in force at the present time are: the WEIGHTS AND MEASURES ACT 1963; the TRADE DESCRIPTIONS ACTS 1968 and 1972; the UNSOLICITED GOODS AND SERVICES ACT 1971 and 1975; the FAIR TRADING ACT 1973; the CONSUMER CREDIT ACT 1974; the CONSUMER SAFETY ACT 1978; the PRICE MARKING (BARGAIN OFFERS) ORDER 1979, SALE OF GOODS ACT 1979; SALE OF GOODS AND SERVICES ACT 1982; ESTATE AGENCY ACT 1979; CONTROL OF MISLEADING ADVERTISEMENTS REGULATIONS 1988; CONSUMER PROTECTION ACT 1987. See FINANCIAL SERVICES AUTHORITY, OMBUDSMAN, OFFICE OF FAIR TRADING, DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. See also CONSUMERISM, COMPETITION POLICY (UK) (EU).

consumer protection

measures taken by the government and independent bodies such as the Consumers’ Association in the UK to protect consumers against unscrupulous trade practices such as false descriptions of goods, incorrect weights and measures, misleading prices and defective goods. See TRADE DESCRIPTIONS ACT 1968, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES ACT 1963, CONSUMER CREDIT ACT 1974, PRICE MARKETING ( BARGAIN OFFERS) ORDER 1979, OFFICE OF FAIR TRADING, COMPETITION POLICY, CONSUMERISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
(106) Alaska based the UTPCPA "on legislation developed in large part by the Federal Trade Commission, [and it] is designed to meet the increasing need in Alaska for the protection of consumers as well as honest businessmen from the depredations of those persons employing unfair or deceptive trade practices." (107) The language in Alaska's UTPCPA parallels the Uniform Deceptive Trade Practices Act (108) drafted by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws.
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), under the authority of the Federal Trade Commission Act, has the authority to monitor unfair or deceptive trade practices of businesses.
The Insurance Department found that although United Healthcare didn't make' prompt claim settlements, the delays did not constitute a "general business practice" and the company was not in violation of the unfair or deceptive trade practices law.