Undocumented


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Undocumented

1. Describing a circumstance for which there is no proof in the form of paperwork. For example, if one takes an undocumented deduction on his/her tax return, the IRS may not allow the deduction.

2. A term for a non-citizen working in a country without proper paperwork (that is, illegally).
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The SP investigation includes seeking an explanation from the Bureau of Immigration why there were many undocumented foreigners in the province.
In late December 2017, the defense ministry relaunched Operacion Escudo (Operation Shield) along the border to prevent the entry of undocumented immigrants during the New Year celebrations.
At the meeting, the ministry's Jeju office said 9,846 foreigners were undocumented on Jeju as of the end of 2017, up nearly 10 times from 992 in 2012.
Sacramento State began to organize workshops and informational events for its undocumented population in 2015.
Qualified to apply are the undocumented and overstaying foreigners, OFWs with expired residency permits or those without the said permits and those who escaped or were abandoned by their employers.
The 2001 state law allows noncitizens, including some undocumented immigrants, to pay in-state tuition rates at public colleges if they can prove they've been Texas residents for at least three years and graduated from a Texas high school or received a GED.
In 2012, approximately 13 percent of K-12 students in California had an undocumented parent, according to the(http://www.
Read "Two Latina students just told the world they were undocumented - with very different results" from Fusion.
Justice for the Undocumented said: "We need immigration reform here in Ireland too.
The case concerning undocumented immigration in the United States is a highly contested and scrutinized issue, and has been at the forefront of many discussions at local, state, and federal governments.
an overview of the rights of undocumented students;
Brown has passed a bill that will enable the smooth transition of 170,000 undocumented children from limited scope Emergency Medi-Cal (the state's name for Medicaid) to full-scope coverage, by eliminating barriers to re-applying or re-enrolling.