syndicate

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Syndicate

A group of banks that acts jointly, on a temporary basis, to loan money in a bank credit (syndicated credit) or to underwrite a new issue of bonds.

Syndicate

1. In banking, a group of banks that each lend an amount of money to a borrower, all at the same time and for the same purpose. The banks in a syndicate cooperate with each other for the duration of the project, even if they are otherwise competitors. Bank syndicates usually only lend large amounts of money. Every syndicate is a temporary arrangement.

2. In investment banking, a group of underwriters responsible for placing a new issue of a security with investors. As with banking syndicates, the members of an underwriting syndicate work together for the duration of the project. Every syndicate is a temporary arrangement. It is also called a purchase group or a selling syndicate.

syndicate

A combination of investment banking firms that bids on a new security issue and then sells it if the bid is successful. The syndicate disbands when the security offering has been completed. Syndicates are needed to spread the risk and obtain greater financial and marketing resources for large issues. Also called purchase group, underwriting syndicate. See also agreement among underwriters, breaking the syndicate, selling group.

syndicate

To distribute shares of ownership in a partnership or joint venture. For example, a brokerage firm may syndicate ownership in certain oil and gas properties.

Syndicate.

When a group of investment banks works together to underwrite and distribute a new security issue, they are acting as a syndicate.

Syndicates are temporary, forming to purchase the securities from the issuer and dissolving once the issue is distributed.

However, new syndicates, involving some of or all the same banks, form on a regular basis to underwrite each new issue. You may also hear these underwriting syndicates called purchase groups, underwriting groups, or distributing syndicates.

In other financial contexts, syndicate may refer to any group of financial institutions that works together on a particular project. Syndicate also describes a group of investors who make a joint investment in a company.

syndicate

A method of selling real property in which a sponsor—the syndicator—sells interests to investors. At one time limited partnerships were the preferred vehicle.Today tenant-in-common properties (TICs) are extremely popular.

References in periodicals archive ?
and E Schultz, 2005, "The Role of IPO Underwriting Syndicates: Pricing, Information Production, and Underwriter Competition," Journal of Finance 60, 443-486.
This section describes the three "information" services hypotheses with respect to the roles played by co-managers in the underwriting syndicate (Corwin and Schultz, 2005).
The first hypothesis regarding the role of underwriting syndicate members posits that syndicate members can provide additional information regarding the market demand for an IPO.
Underwriting Syndicate Structure and "Information" Services
The evidence presented thus far indicates that an increase in the number of co-managers in the underwriting syndicate is associated with an increase in information production and certification during the premarket period and with an increase in analyst coverage during the postmarket era.
In this section, we empirically test whether the "information" services provided by the underwriting syndicate have an impact on the secondary market liquidity of the firm.
The evidence in Table III confirms our assertion that an increase in the number of co-managers in the underwriting syndicate is associated with a decrease in the level of information asymmetry.
Underwriting Syndicate Structure and the Bid-Ask Spread
Specifically, the addition of one co-manager to the underwriting syndicate leads to a 7.89% decrease in the magnitude of the spread.
Underwriting Syndicate Structure and the Adverse Selection Component of the Spread