Underwater Option

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Underwater Option

An out-of-the-money stock option. That is, it describes an option in which the underlying asset is a stock that is currently trading for less than the strike price of the option. For example, an executive at a publicly-traded company may have stock options in which he/she may buy the stock of his/her own company for $80 per share. If the stock is currently trading at $60 per share, the options are worthless.
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A number of functions convenient for underwater photography have also been added, including Underwater options for white balance and auto distortion control.
It is designed to provide more underwater options for people that currently use a Nucleus 5 Sound Processor, which already has the highest level of water resistance for an ear level device.
Some companies offered new options at lower exercise prices in exchange for underwater options while others repriced existing stock options.
In other words, the poor performance of firms with underwater options was mainly due to industry-related factors.
Underwater options represent an inefficient allocation of resources that arguably serve the interests of neither party--as companies must continue to recognize accounting charges for awards that provide no value to the company or its employees.
The deferred tax asset related to underwater options can be reversed only when the options are canceled, exercised or expire unexercised.
First, for the executive-year observations, the distributions of both risk-taking incentive measures are higher when I limit the sample to include only those executives with underwater options.
Underwater options fail to retain executives, while also losing their effectiveness in terms of creating ownership incentives.
Judith Greaves, national head of tax at Pinsents and co-author of the report, said: 'Although the sector has seen a sustained period of growth over the past year, the depth of underwater options continues to be a cause for concern for many companies, with much of the available share capital often taken up by 'worthless' options.
By canceling underwater options whose exercise price is well above the company's stock price, then re-pricing and re-granting those options to be effective more than six months later, these firms are able to defeat the intent of FIN 44: They avoid all compensation expense recognition for the re-priced options.
Additionally, the Class Action was a contributory cause in the decision to separate thinkorswim's single Underwater Options vote proposal into two votes.
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