Unavoidable Costs

Unavoidable Costs

Costs a company incurs regardless of the operational decisions it makes. Examples of unavoidable costs include rent, office supplies and some taxes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prices of online tickets for concerts, theatre shows, and festivals are now displayed with all unavoidable costs included.
According to the National Audit Office (NAO), across the country, schools will need to find an extra PS3bn by 2020 to continue offering their current services because a number of unavoidable costs will go up, with no extra money to cover them.
According to the National Audit Office, schools across the country will need to find an extra PS3bn by 2020 to continue offering their current services because a number of unavoidable costs will go up, with no extra money to cover them.
The effects faced by the people of Burma and Vietnam are considered unavoidable costs of failing to adapt to climate change, which officials classify as loss and damage.
Kirklees has already made huge cost savings yet more could be made simply by looking at unavoidable costs such as paying over the odds for temporary staff, further sale or rent of empty buildings/land/ works.
The other is the benefits that help pay for specific unavoidable costs.
The Government must ensure it is doing everything to put consumers first and help keep the unavoidable costs of living in check.
Unavoidable costs associated with lost revenues, both recurring and nonrecurring, are potentially eligible for recovery as a foreseeable loss (i.
Failing to make the full cost of bookings transparent was a violation of European regulations, the Dutch consumer authority added, saying, 'Ryanair offered air fares on its website that did not include all foreseeable and unavoidable costs, such as fees and surcharges.
He said hospitals needed to be compensated to recognise the specific unavoidable costs they faced and commercial information could be kept confidential.
These are: (1) clear lines of answerability; (2) a clear definition of the "responsibilities" for which an organization's leaders will be held accountable; (3) provisions for the reporting of performance; (4) defining and measuring "outcomes" and widely-recognized "core indicators" which relate "results" to "purpose", recognize the limits of unavoidable costs and available resources and which can be used systematically in decision making; (5) carefully balanced incentives; (6) relevant legal and financial rules and reporting to monitor compliance; and (7) a balance between the processes that hold organizations accountable and the authority needed to respond quickly to a dynamic marketplace.
These additional and unavoidable costs to maintain their properties and could result in decisions to postpone work or for retail tenant not to invest in those buildings and locate elsewhere.