Grant

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Grant

The issuance of an award under a stock plan, such as a stock option or shares of restricted stock.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Grant

An amount of money given, usually by a government or nonprofit organization, to fund certain projects. One may receive a grant for academic or scientific research, or to further one's education, or to engage in charity work. The United States government makes many grants, often of an educational or scientific nature. Grants are also a key part of many philanthropic foundations' activities.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

grant

The act of conveying title to real estate via a voluntary transfer. In some states, use of the words “grant,bargain,and sell”in a deed automatically incorporates some or all of the typical deed warranties. (See warranty deed.) In order to avoid the consequences of such statutes, if a grantor wishes to convey title without any warranties,it should use a quitclaim deed or the words “bargain, sell,and quitclaim”rather than “grant,bargain,and sell.”

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Madison Barracks was once the home of Ulysses S. Grant, who was stationed there as a second lieutenant after returning from the Mexican War in 1848.
Ulysses S. Grant was inaugurated president of the United States.
Grant's final victory; Ulysses S. Grant's heroic last year.
McFeely, who taught for many years at Mount Holyoke College, won the Pulitzer Prize and the Francis Parkman Prize in 1982 for his seminal work on Ulysses S. Grant, "Grant: A Biography." The author traces Grant's life from his birth in 1822 in Ohio through his boyhood and to the battlefields of the Civil War.
The difference, some maintain, was that Ulysses S. Grant was waging "honorable" warfare while Sherman behaved more like Attila the Hun.
Kennedy, 1961-63.) Presidents have had five raises since Washington's day: to $50,000 in 1873 (Ulysses S. Grant); $75,000 in 1909 (William H.
Needham Whitfield, a chief Confederate surgeon on Pemberton's staff, who, following the siege of Vicksburg, befriended General Ulysses S. Grant. Whitfield so impressed the General, that Grant bestowed him with a pass that would allow him through enemy lines to travel, without charge or threat to his safety, to any government post or headquarters.
In 1869 President Ulysses S. Grant began turning over the full responsibility for the administration of Indian agencies to American churches and missionary bodies, whose assumed honesty and charitable motives were expected to give them success in achieving pacification and assimilation of the tribes.
Ulysses S. Grant: Triumph Over Adversity, 1822-1865.
"Pete" Long presenting the text of two Ulysses S. Grant letters then owned by Newman.
The possible significance of a brother-sister relationship is evident in one of Ulysses S. Grant's letters to Julia Dent, his future wife.
Ulysses S. Grant's third-term ambitions, although he had reluctantly disclaimed any intention of running in a statement made on May 29.