U.S. Information Agency

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U.S. Information Agency

A former organization of the U.S. State Department that distributed information to foreign countries. It advocated American policy abroad. During the Cold War, its content was largely pro-American propaganda. It existed from 1953 to 1999.
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These two actions are at odds with an effort to stand up a robust USIA on steroids.
As a guard against this eventuality, however, Congress included in the legislation dissolving USIA a provision that protects public diplomacy budgets and resources into the future.
During the hearing before Ogden, which began on August 9th, 1920, USIA maintained the failure of the tank had been due to sabotage, probably by Italian anarchists, who were known to be active in the country and in Boston at the time.
An official USIA dispatch after the opening of the exhibition predicted that the American kitchen could result in "a minor feminine revolution in Russia." (29) It was a Trojan Horse of the "American way of life," which aimed to breach the fortress of communism, steal away the hearts of millions of deprived Soviet Helens, and restore them to their true consumerist selves, from which state socialism had alienated them.
Much of the book details the activities of the USIA, based on exhaustive research, including newly declassified documents from the Eisenhower Library.
(20) Charles Harner, PAO USIS-Caracas, to USIA Washington, 17 January 1962 (Harner to USIA, January 17, 1962); Latin America; Foreign Service Despatches, 1954-1965 (FSD 1954-1965); Records of the United States Information Agency (USIA), Record Group 306 (RG 306); NARA.
Information Agency (USIA) first as a magazine editor and then as director of the agency's cultural, education and information programs at U.S.
Information Agency (USIA), the government's official overseas propaganda arm during the Cold War, from 1981 to 1987.
"Cultural Diplomacy: Recommendations and Research," a report based on studies commissioned by the Center for Arts and Culture, points to a shocking decline in activity: "The number of academic and cultural exchanges has dropped from 45,000 in 1995 to 29,000 in 2001." With the 1999 dismantling of the United States Information Agency (USIA) and its absorption into the State Department's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the staff of the government's chief cultural diplomatic arm now numbers 6,715, as compared to more than 12,000 in the mid-1960s.
She has also worked with the United States Information Agency (USIA) and the British Council.
Another of our initiatives was the creation of an international group of eminent persons, chaired by former Deputy Director of USIA Penn Kemble and Ambassador George Moose, which traveled to the Sudan to investigate slavery and issued a series of concrete recommendations for eliminating this nefarious practice.