U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement

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U.S.-Canada Free Trade Agreement

A treaty between the United States and Canada that went into effect in 1988 and in which each country pledged to reduce their tariffs over a period of 10 years. It also eased the conditions under which cross-border investment could occur. The agreement greatly increased international trade between Canada and the U.S. NAFTA superseded it in 1994.
References in periodicals archive ?
In discussing recent changes, the focus is more on Mexico than Canada, as many of the changes between the US and Canada have been implemented as part of the US-Canada Free Trade Agreement. Distributed in North America by Aspen Publishers, Inc.
She was one of Canada's leading voices in the battle against the US-Canada Free Trade Agreement, NAFTA and the Multilateral Agreement on Investment.
Simon Reisman, the government's chief negotiator for the US-Canada Free Trade Agreement (FTA) was there, as was Donald Macdonald, chairman of the royal commission on Canada's economy, which had initially promoted free trade as a "leap of faith," and Thomas D'Aquino, president of the Business Council on National Issues, which had led the corporate lobbying campaigns for both the FTA and NAFTA.
Prior to implementation of the US-Canada Free Trade Agreement (CFTA), Canadian tariffs on US metalworking machinery ranged up to 9.3%.
Under the US-Canada Free Trade Agreement, tariffs have been reduced annually since 1989 and were eliminated on TABULAR DATA OMITTED Jan.