U.S. Dollar

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U.S. Dollar

The currency of the United States. First issued in 1792, it is the currency used most often in international transactions. After World War II, most world currencies were pegged to the dollar, which was pegged to gold. In 1971, the dollar became a fiat currency. Nevertheless, many currencies are still pegged to the dollar, and it is one of the most important reserve currencies in the world.
References in periodicals archive ?
The weighted average rate of the US dollar based on results of the morning and afternoon sessions was 320.
According to sources, the government has received US dollar 138.
These are a one billion US dollar Sukuk that listed in February 2017 and a 700 million US dollar Sukuk that listed in May 2014.
Those resources are used by a country to buy US dollars from the market, at market rates, to provide the same US dollars to banks and companies that need to service their debts, denominated in US dollar, or to spend on imports, etc.
The shortage of US dollars in banks has forced these manufacturers to secure their foreign currency needs from the informal market, which sells the US dollar at a higher exchange rate than the banks, according to Abdellah.
Shell is capping its capital spending Shell added that it will forge ahead with 30bn US dollars (PS20.
During year 2007-08, the country imported mobile phone handsets with battery worth US dollar 445.
PowerShares DB 3x Short US Dollar Index Futures ETNs (3x Short ETNs): UDNT
The decision aims to regulate the informal market, which threatens the stability of the Egyptian pound against the US dollar.
In the future the ECB will, on a regular basis, assess the need for US dollar liquidity-providing operations.
8 billion US dollars over the first half of 2012, much higher than its previous estimate of two billion US dollars.
The cost of maintaining QE2 and keeping nominal Fed Fund rates at close to 0 percent and real Fed Fund rates well below 0 percent will continue to pressure<br /> the US dollar.