Address

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Address

1. The physical place where a person or company resides or does business. Most places are on a road of some kind; each building on a road has an individual number so a person or company can receive mail at the address.

2. The place where a person or company receives mail. For example, one's mailing address may be a box at the post office. One can retrieve mail there.

3. A location in the World Wide Web where one can find a website. It is usually followed by a suffix such as .com, .org, or .net. For example, the address for TheFreeDictionary is www.TheFreeDictionary.com.
References in periodicals archive ?
The longtime leading platform for short URLs is Twitter because of their 140 character limit.
Also in the vein of simplicity, many organizations are moving away from the traditional www in their URL.
Less obvious, though, was that the rigor of URL patterns, and the thinking it reflected, became increasingly correlated with the value (including authority and quality) of associated content.
One catch to the customer URLs, however,according to website Mashable, is that Google says in the fine print that it might start charging for them some day.
One great feature of MultiURL is that you can password protect your URL stack.
And it's likely to happen a lot more, now one of the most popular URL shortening services, tr.
This research has two objectives: First it presents a logging scheme to track historical links by recording the time and the type of changes that occurred to a document and the document's URL and an archive scheme to store and retrieve document snapshots and deleted documents.
URL change notification: always a challenge is keeping up with changing URLs.
The URLs in these examples are incorrect and bring error messages, but URL trimming can find the correct web sites:
Changing the graphics URL to point to the new server removes the load from the Web server.
If the URL has just been announced and you get a blank screen, the site owners probably haven't planned adequately for high traffic and didn't format the site so you can see text before large graphics load.
DOES THE MENTION of a Web site address -- or URL -- in a low-cost print classified ad give that ad the potential clout of a large display ad?