United Nations Conference on Environment and Development

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United Nations Conference on Environment and Development

A major United Nations conference held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. Participants discussed environmental issues, notably continued production of toxic materials in industry and elsewhere. The conference was considered a success: it led directly to the Kyoto Protocol in 1997. The conference is also called the Rio Summit and the Earth Summit.
References in periodicals archive ?
99) UNCED solidified this sustainable development concept by adopting Chapter 17 of Agenda 21, which centered around the protection of the world's oceans with an eye to sustainable practices, but the focus had not yet narrowed to fisheries conservation exclusively.
Rio+20 would have been the occasion to assess what happened since UNCED.
1994) 'Financing the UNCED agenda: The controversy over additionality', Environment, 36(3), pp.
The most productive, in terms of their administrative accomplishments, have been UNCHE, the 1974 World Food Conference, UNCED, and the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development.
Several analyses of the Rio Declaration, the CBD and the UNFCCC reflect the broad spectrum of environmental protection, human rights and development issues and positions that are reflective of the UNCED process.
Eighty one per cent of the labour force in Nepal depends on agriculture (UNDP/Nepal 1997: 1; UNCED 1992:29) and is exerting pressure on agricultural land.
For Chatterjee and Finger, UNCED was not an isolated event, but the culmination of the decades-long evolution of development ideology.
Similarly, the Framework Convention on Climate Change, which was signed by more than 150 countries at UNCED, requires developed countries to provide developing countries with "such financial resources, including for the transfer of technology, needed by the developing country Parties to meet the agreed full incremental costs of implementing measures" to reduce greenhouse gas emissions or adapt to climate change.
Follow through continues on the UNCED efforts to integrate environmental and economic concerns, as evidenced by the recent United Nations resolution to establish a Commission on Sustainable Development.
Thus, Thomas's choice of topics reflects, in many ways, the bias of the developed world's priorities during the UNCED process.
Favoring sustainable use of natural resources is a must in the aftermath of the UNCED conference in Rio in 1993.