United Auto Workers

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United Auto Workers

A U.S. labor union based in Detroit that was established in 1935 to represent workers in the American automotive industry.
References in periodicals archive ?
The UAW of the 21st century must be fundamentally and radically different from the UAW of the 20th century.
For UAW workers, that's down from about $61 an hour.
To compensate for these losses, the UAW bargained four lump sum payments in each year of the contracts.
Although Ford is widely considered to have the strongest working relationship with the UAW, one analyst said it was still unlikely to get deeper concessions than its rivals.
For instance, Barnard provides an engaging description of the tactics that Homer Martin, the UAW'S unsteady and often autocratic first president, employed to keep control of the 1937 convention.
So the real question becomes: if the OEMs and the UAW were able to solve their disputes this negotiation year and reach parity with the New Domestics in terms of labor costs, would the OEMs return to profitability and maybe even beat the new domestics?
[GRAPHIC OMITTED] Contract Highlights What the UAW achieved: Wage rate increase of 2% in the third year and 3% in the fourth year.
The second paragraph in Sarah Webster's story put it this way: "Thursday, as UAW members continue voting on their new contract, the controversial proposal that shocked many union members into action - - health care coverage for abortions - - has been quashed."
Now is the time for both sides to quit finger pointing and instead explore and implement contract and relation ship changes that increase Big 3 competitiveness and satisfy certain co-dependent objectives of the Big 3 and UAW. Maintaining traditional adversarial practices will only insure suppliers, UAW and the Big 3 fail together.
For example, when carrying placards was banned in the 1950's, the UAW wrote the messages they wanted to get across on aprons.
In the early UAW years, disputes between union and non-union workers and between UAW-CIO and UAW-AFL members resulted in physical encounters between and among auto workers.