U.S. Dollar

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U.S. Dollar

The currency of the United States. First issued in 1792, it is the currency used most often in international transactions. After World War II, most world currencies were pegged to the dollar, which was pegged to gold. In 1971, the dollar became a fiat currency. Nevertheless, many currencies are still pegged to the dollar, and it is one of the most important reserve currencies in the world.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bond with a maturity of 5.5 years comprises a fixed rate tranche with a volume of 2.25 billion U.S. dollars and a coupon of 3.875 percent p.
Besides, the country also imported fruits and veggies worth 6.6 million U.S. dollars from New Zealand, 4.4 million U.S.
For the nation's foreign financial assets as of the end of 2011, reserve assets stood at 3.26 trillion U.S. dollars, direct investment stood at 364.2 billion U.S.
In the fiscal year of2010, Microsoft's revenue is 62 billion U.S. dollars and the profit was 18.7 billion U.S.
Exports to Italy became 1.7 billion U.S. dollars, exports to France became 1.6 billion U.S.
Among those five steps was changing the way the yuan is pegged to the U.S. dollar.
Forced liquidation value (auction) is a professional opinion of the estimated most probable price expressed in terms of cash in U.S. dollars which could typically be realized at a properly advertised and conducted public auction sale, held under forced sale conditions and under present day economic trends, as of the effective date of the appraisal report.
* Many members suggested eliminating the U.S. dollar income statement and balance sheet reporting, except for entities subject to DASTM or those using the U.S.
The regulations under subpart J seem to reflect a transaction's true economic substance, but only when an individual whose functional currency is the U.S. dollar purchases an asset.
The group's flagship, the Hongkong Bank Group, with wide exposure in the region, allocated 5.926 billion Hong Kong dollars (764.65 million U.S. dollars) as provisions for bad debt, compared with 752 million Hong Kong dollars (97 million U.S.
Currency risk is also a part of the equation when investing overseas; since the performance of foreign stocks is partially driven by the value of the U.S. dollar. When you put $1,000 in an international fund, you're actually buying foreign currency your dollars--for French francs, Japanese yen or German marks--in order to buy stocks.
The Chase-Tokyo clearing arrangement for U.S. dollars is based on correspondent banking relationships with customers.

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