U.S. Treasury Bond

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U.S. Treasury Bond

A debt security backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government with a maturity of more than 10 years. They may be purchased directly from the government or from a bank; they have coupon payments payable every six months. Treasury bonds may be bought competitively or non-competitively. In a non-competitive transaction, one takes the interest rate he/she is given on a T-bond. In competitive investing, one bids on a desired yield, but this does not mean it will be accepted. Treasury bonds are low-risk, low-return investments. The minimum purchase is $1,000 and the maximum is $5 million in non-competitive bidding or 35% of the offering in competitive. They are known informally as T-bonds. See also: Treasury bill, Treasury note.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the bond market, U.S. Treasury bonds fell as yields rose.
A steep sell-off in U.S. Treasury bonds that started midweek and pushed 10-year yields to seven-year highs has weighed on stocks and rippled through bond markets globally.
Quantitative easing, or the Federal Reserve's strategy of buying up U.S. Treasury bonds and mortgage-backed securities to drive down long-term interest rates, makes it relatively inexpensive to borrow, especially for banks, institutions and private companies.
U.S. Treasury bonds, due to their security, gauge interest rates by setting the interest rate floor of financial markets.
According to research from the University of California-Davis, premium rates are actually tied to the rise and fall of the Dow Jones Industrial Average and interest rates on U.S. Treasury bonds. Using information from the U.S.
The UAE central bank does not hold any U.S. treasury bonds or government financial instruments, it said in July.
interest rates, which pushed up the value of Japan's holdings of U.S. Treasury bonds, a ministry official said.
A point to keep in mind: In 1984, foreign entities owned 22 percent of U.S. Treasury bonds; today, foreign entities own 57 percent of U.S.
said, "Commercial Defeasances' ability to think beyond the ordinary, specifically to find higher yielding securities than run-of-the-mill U.S. Treasury bonds and traditional agency debt, saved us a substantial amount of money."
U.S. Treasury bonds fell in the wake of the decision while the dollar held steady and stock markets were mixed
There was a spread of 85 basis points (0.85 percent) between these ten-year ROK bonds and U.S. Treasury bonds, approximately 5 basis points lower than the bonds issued last year.
Foreign central banks, which hold more than half the outstanding stock of U.S. Treasury bonds, have become the principal source of finance for the federal government's burgeoning fiscal deficits--about 4 percent of GDP in 2004.

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