Producer Price Index

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Producer Price Index (PPI)

Index measuring changes in wholesale prices, published by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics every month.

Producer Price Index

An index tracking the price of goods bought and sold in bulk before they reach the retail level. The producer price index usually tracks changes in these prices on a monthly basis. A large change in producer prices can lead to a change in retail prices, which affects consumers most directly. As a result, a few countries use the producer price index as a measure of inflation, but most do not. A dramatic increase in producer prices, however, may be seen as an early indicator of inflation. It is also called the wholesale price index.

producer price index

A comprehensive index of price changes at the wholesale level. Because wholesale price changes eventually find their way into consumer prices, the producer price index is closely watched as an early indicator of future retail price changes. Formerly called wholesale price index, price index. Compare consumer price index. See also GDP deflator.
References in periodicals archive ?
In New York on Tuesday, the dollar lost ground against the yen as a lower-than-expected rise in the U.S. producer price index for July helped reduce expectations that the Fed will resume interest rate hikes in the near future, traders said.
Dealers said the dollar advanced on higher-than-expected rises of the core U.S. producer price index and retail sales for May.
During New York trading hours Tuesday, the dollar's renewed strength was further supported by higher-than-expected rises in the core U.S. producer price index and retail sales for May.
The expectations heightened after the core U.S. producer price index, excluding food and energy costs, showed a lower-than-expected rise in April from the previous month while April U.S.
In New York on Tuesday, the dollar drew buying on news that the core U.S. producer price index, which excludes food and energy prices, posted a bigger-than-expected rise in February.
In Tokyo, dealers said, market players wanted to wait and see the results of the U.S. producer price index and retail sales data to be released later in the day.
Traders moved to buy back the dollar to adjust their positions ahead of the release of the U.S. producer price index on Tuesday, dealers said.
Some market players adopted a wait-and-see stance ahead of the release later in the day of the U.S. producer price index and housing starts data for November.