United States Merchant Marine

(redirected from U.S. Merchant Marine)

United States Merchant Marine

The fleet of private and government-owned, non-military ships operating in the United States. The Merchant Marine delivers cargo and passengers in peacetime. During times of war, it may be ordered to assist the U.S. Navy. Since 1988, mariners who served in wars have had access to veterans' benefits.
References in periodicals archive ?
military to forward-deploy around the world and acknowledging the need to coordinate military lift capabilities for all the services, the U.S. Merchant Marine, and the airline industry, the U.S.
Higgins graduated from the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy in 1990.
Formerly a U.S. Merchant Marine officer, Smith has held a variety of chief executive positions at the Grand Fallsview Hotel, the Boys and Girls Club and Buffalo Transportation.
He also has U.S. Merchant Marine Credentials as a 50-Ton Master and an undergraduate degree in marketing from Southeastern Louisiana University.
degree from the New York Maritime College at Fort Schuyler and was a licensed U.S. Merchant Marine Deck Officer; he received his doctorate in physical oceanography from the University of Miami, where he later taught as adjunct professor of meteorology and physical oceanography.
Navy; Quartermaster, U.S. Merchant Marine; Foreign Service Officer, Counselor of Embassy for Economic & Commercial Affairs, Manila, Philippines; U.S.
The U.S. merchant marine now numbers less than 100 vessels in international trade.
The Med: The U.S. Merchant Marine in the Mediterranean During World War II
Coast Guard Academy in the new football league, and Maine Maritime Academy, the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy and Norwich University will enter the NEWMAC as associate members.
Fortunately, efforts are currently underway at the Maritime Administration to develop a National Maritime Strategy that will hopefully include clear recommendations for Congress to strengthen the U.S. merchant marine and shipyard industrial base.
At issue is the Jones Act,--formerly known as U.S. Merchant Marine Act of 1920--that requires that shipments from one U.S.