Bureau of Land Management

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Bureau of Land Management

An agency of the U.S.Department of the Interior,charged with the care,custody,and management of all land owned by the U.S.government,comprising approximately 261 million acres. It also maintains current and historical information regarding land ownership and use, maintains a geospatial (GIS) data clearinghouse, and manages and provides access to the public land survey system, also called the rectangular survey system employed in surveying real property.(The Bureau of Land Management Web site is at www.blm.gov.)

The Complete Real Estate Encyclopedia by Denise L. Evans, JD & O. William Evans, JD. Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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* In April, 2019, the Company received a 2-year extension from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (the"BLM") for its Notice of Intent (the"NOI") exploration permit to conduct further drilling on the Lapon Gold Project,
The Phase II drill program is expected to begin in September, following the compilation of the Phase Iresults and pending receipt of an exploration drilling permit from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (the 'BLM').
Byline: Submitted by Martha Malik U.S. Bureau of Land Management
The ruling directs the U.S. Bureau of Land Management to set aside its final grazing decisions for about 80 square miles (200 square kilometers) of allotments in Twin Falls County and then reissue them with terms consistent with the ruling.
The changesby the U.S. Bureau of Land Management will guide future efforts to conserve greater sage grouse, ground-dwelling birds that range across portions of 11 Western states.
On the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's only hotshot crew focused on recruiting veterans, members have traded assault rifles and other weapons of war for chain saws and shovels.
If the U.S. Bureau of Land Management approves RMR's forthcoming formal proposal, Glenwood Springs roads would potentially see an increase in dump truck traffic to 250 to 350 trips daily.
That leaves 29 percent - about 490 people - in positions with the Forest Service, U.S. Bureau of Land Management and other agencies that could see large furloughs if the shutdown drags on.
In all, authorities charged 26 protesters with conspiring to impede federal workers from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and U.S.