Words per Minute

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Words per Minute

The number of words of dictation a person can type in one minute. Maintaining a high WPM rate is an important clerical skill for persons who are expected to type or retype documents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adjusted Typing Speed (wpm) Noise Condition T1 46.5 T2 47.9 T3 48.3 T4 46.4 T5 47.5 T6 47.5 Figure 2 The adjusted typing speed in words per minute for each noise condition, averaged across all subjects.
For the novice touch typist, the price of not looking at the keys while typing involves a relatively high error rate and an initially slow typing speed. For example, in a preliminary study in our laboratory (Yechiam, Erev, Gopher, & Yehene, 2000), we instructed experienced computer users with many hours at the keyboard, but with no touch-typing experience, to type without looking at the keyboard.
This tracks stuff like your typing speed and shows you the correct finger positions while you type in Microsoft Word or another text editor.
Later, he was told his typing speed hadn't influenced his hiring.
It has a word-prediction function, which significantly increases my typing speed.
This utility can demonstrate the real-time typing speed of an agent, spelling and grammatical errors and the overall content of the message.
Users can track their progress on graphic diagrams, illustrating typing speed, accuracy and difficult keys With improved network capabilities, TypingMaster 2002 can be implemented for use-on multiple computers.
Robert boasts shorthand of 120 words per minute and a typing speed of 70 words per minute.
Despite these built-in flaws and tests showing that other designs could double typing speed, the QWERTY became so widely accepted that it survived improvements in typewriters that eliminated jamming and, more recently, became the standard for computer keyboards.
Then with corrections, the effective typing speed comes to about 40 words per minute.
In two studies, using skilled typists, a negative correlation was found between choice reaction time and age (indicating a processing speed deficit), but there was no association between age and typing speed. Using an experimental design which enabled the number of visible 'to-be-typed' characters to be controlled, Salthouse was able to demonstrate that, compared to their younger counterparts, older typists 'looked ahead' further, suggesting a process of compensation.
It is frequently claimed that the keyboard was actually configured to reduce typing speed, since that would have been one way to avoid the jamming of the typewriter.